"Poh Lei" tea leaves - Page 2
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Thread: "Poh Lei" tea leaves

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
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    Subang Jaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charbroiled View Post
    I like Poh Lei because of its flavor.
    My favorite is 'Kuk Pou', it is 'Pou lei' plus 'chrysanthemum flowers' which gives it more fragrance.

    Green tea is good for health but the flavour is not strong enough.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Putra heights
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    3,676
    Rhiga,i hv been searching this Taiwanese tea for 10 yrs until i found it in KLCC Book Fair and the shop is just in S/Avenue.The tea hv alit bit of "lemak" taste and can quench my thirst easily.Never been a Pu Lei drinker as we don't know the actual value.Normally i get my supplies in Petaling Street.My favorite is Tik kon Yam or jasmine other than the Taiwanese Olong green tea.Of course sometimes Kilkenny or Pinot Nior.! Cheers! burp!!

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Malaysia
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    4,468
    Yup, they also sms me about their participation in KLCC but I didn’t go..

    The taste you described I think have something to do with how they “bake” the tea leaves

    I think the owner studied/worked in Taiwan before – from his slang.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Malaysia
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    4,468
    Quote Originally Posted by Charbroiled View Post
    I like Poh Lei because of its flavor. I hate "tit kun yam". It's overly bitter in a non-flavorsome way. . Japanese green tea...I don't quite like it either. Don't agree with its "strange" taste but I love its cancer-fighting abilities so I do drink it sometimes.
    I think the choice of tea is very much related to the food…

    I don’t mind strong tea like Pur Er after a heavy, oily meal..

    As I practically substitute tea as plain water, I prefer mild-taste Chinese green tea like the Dragon Well (long jing) and the Taiwanese green tea like the high altitude Oolong.

    It is very nice to have a cup of hot Chinese green tea while you are reading a book.

    And for Japanese green tea, I guess the “strange” taste is due to the freshness of the tea powder and I think it blends well with raw fish sashimi..

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    sj
    Posts
    191
    Charbroiled. Reason the tit kun yam or tie guan yin here is bitter is because of the lowest grade available esp in restaurants. I normally stock up tie guan yin from my regular trips to xiamen and my pu er from guangzhou. I buy those rmb750 to 1500/gm and pu er easily rmb1000/cake. For tie guan yin, those i buy is not bitter and infact taste very "kam" and refreshing. The leaves are green unlike here whereby it's the broken branches and brownish/dark leftovers. Same for puer. I dont recall buying any puer here. Btw, here the tea vendors obviously mark up easily 50-100%. I stock up twice a year and vacuum pack it after purchasing in China and store in the freezer. And there are differences in terms of autumn tea and spring tea. Always go for the autumn.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    sj
    Posts
    191
    And the difference, pu er is less gassy/acidic compare to tie guan yin. I also like those lavender, chamomile teas, especially TWG - finest tea , they hv an outlet in pavillion. So i enjoy my tea, be it Oriental , china or Jap green tea, or western

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    In a bowl
    Posts
    11,450
    Me, simple, OSK Japanese green tea (teabags) will do for me nicely day and night ....
    Everyday is a good day for GOOD FOOD and a GOOD LAUGH

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