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Thread: Malay Origins

  1. #91
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    Malaysia comprises the Malay Peninsula, the southern most tip of the Asian mainland, and the states of Sabah and Sarawak, situated 530 kilometers further east across the South China Sea in Northern Borneo.

    Malaysia�s prehistory begins with the earliest known traces of human habitation around 40 millenniums ago, and extend through the prehistoric period to the founding of Melaka Sultanate in the 1400, the date commonly used as the starting point of the historic era. Because so much has been written about Melaka, that the long period preceding it, that is the prehistory period has been overshadowed.


    Err...the Pre-Historic Malaysia...as published by Perpustakaan Negara Malaysia...

    http://sejarahmalaysia.pnm.my/portal...1&section=sm01

  2. #92
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    The ancient Malay Sultanate of Melaka was a sultanate whose rein of government was entirely in the hands of the rulers and the Malay officials. The Malay rulers of Melaka originated from Singapore that was after the defeat of the Malay kingdom of Singapore by the Siamese. The Malay Sultanate of Melaka lasted for little over a century, stretching from the end of the fourteenth century to the early part of the sixteenth century that is from 1394 to 1511. Under the reign of the Malay rulers, Melaka was not only a prosperous trading town but also the center for the spread of Islam for the whole of the Malay Archipelago. After the decline of the Seri Vijaya and Majapahit Empires at the end of the fourteenth century, it was Melaka, which raised and maintained Malay rule in the Malay Archipelago. Political stability and a just legal system attracted traders from all over the Archipelago to Melaka. Traders from China, Indian sub-continent, Pegu in Burma and Arabia came to Melaka to trade.

    Err...the Ancient Malay Government...as published by Perpustakaan Negara Malaysia...

    http://sejarahmalaysia.pnm.my/portal...9&section=sm01

  3. #93
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    This is a slightly off from the originl topic..........

    I was doing research on loh-kong's forefathers and stumbled on this gem. The title of the book is Twentieth Century Impressions of British Malaya writtten in 1907 and published in 1908. I found what I was looking for and more! I think i've spent a zillion hours reading it.

    The book was meant to be a complete guide for "businessmen throughout the empire". EVERYTHING you wanted to know about Malaya is there. It includes the history of the country to the who's who of the country. The book includes lots of indept research and personal observations of current everyday life and social activities of those who were posted here. It has a write-up of EVERY notable person and company during that time and a brief history of their backgrounds. It also includes write-ups of every estate in the country. The book is choc-a-block full of pictures.

    The book is fascinating. Section 2 of the book (from page 74 - page 114) tells the entire history of Malaya. From the believes of the loal indigenous tribes on how human race began, before, during and after the Malacca
    Sultanate right up to present time (present being 1907). Its like reading a history book but much more interesting!

    Guaranteed page turner! Link as below. You can go to the contents page for easier navigation. The go-to page is at the right hand corner. Start from the top page A

    http://dlxs.library.cornell.edu/cgi/...=image;seq=417
    Last edited by in; 19-10-2006 at 12:56 PM.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by in
    Twentieth Century Impressions of British Malaya writtten in 1907 and published in 1908.
    I have this book. I'd recommend it equally strong as you.

    I'm not sure if I've mentioned this book before, but another very strong recommendation would be "The Malay Archipelago" by Alfred Russel Wallace, first published in 1869 by MacMillan. This book is Malay-centric, but not Malaysia centric.

    The Appendix of this book has a fascinating comparative language study of 59 Malay languages and dialects, of which many are now extinct.
    See you...

    Isa Rahim

  5. #95
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    Hi isarahim, do you know how I can get my hands on a copy of Twentieth Century Impressions? How much would it cost me roughly? Its nice reading it on the net, but nothing beats an actual book and turning its pages.

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by in
    Hi isarahim, do you know how I can get my hands on a copy of Twentieth Century Impressions? How much would it cost me roughly?
    Oops, if I recall correctly I got mine from a Kings Cross antiquary... Price? Can't recall, but it wasn't much.

    Can it be found in Malaysia? Well, you won't find it in MPH. Sometimes, when I'm around, I go to third floor AmCorp mall, the one near PJ town. There are some second hand bookshops there. Most of it is junk of course, but on occasion you get real surprises!
    See you...

    Isa Rahim

  7. #97
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    Hi again isarahim, I wanted to send you a private message, but it seems to be full, you need to delete some messages to clear space.

  8. #98
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    in, thank you for the excellent link, will definately spend my long weekend productively, lol!

    Now I'm going to dig up my old history book and see how big is the gap there. Man, love history here!

  9. #99
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    i never read history books of malaya its so diffuclt to single out fiction and non fiction...sometimes the facts are very contradictory so much so history wasnt my favourite subject....even today its still be mischievously altered.

  10. #100
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    Well... histories are known to be written by the winners only, or by those in power.
    Most of the time it will be biased, and labelled the losers as villians and twisting the facts. Not to mention most of the time they can't differenciate between fiction and facts!

    It's hard to get any accurate and neutral information nowadays
    Now I won't bother reading the news on newspaper, especially the news regarding our gomen, it's all lies, lies and lies

    Example of biased or little unknown history is the Taj Mahal. Everyone only remember the beauty and the love story of the Taj Mahal tomb. But in actual fact the sultan of the time is not building the tomb purely out of love, but is to show case his wealth and power, and many has died when building the tomb and streching the expenses of his kingdom. After the completion of Taj Mahal, he intended to build another much grander one, using black granite/marble for himself at another location. But before the completion of his tomb, he's imprisoned by his sons to prevent more madness, and his incomplete tomb is destroyed. Eventually he died in the dungeon as a mad sultan.
    People should not be afraid of their government, the government should be afraid of the people. - V
    When the people fear their goverment there is tyranny, when the goverment fears the people there is LIBERTY! - Thomas Jefferson

  11. #101
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    History is also exactly what it says, 'his story'. Very seldom it's 'her story'.
    See you...

    Isa Rahim

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyShadow
    Well... histories are known to be written by the winners only, or by those in power. Most of the time it will be biased, and labelled the losers as villians and twisting the facts. Not to mention most of the time they can't differenciate between fiction and facts!
    I disagree. Not that you are wrong, but because you need to differ between history as a science and history as a policy. Since science will always strive to determine 'what actually happened', political history will always be subject to scrutiny and reevaluation. At the same time, political history is only meaningful when there is political advantage to do so. Once it loses this meaningfulness, scientific history will take over.

    In other words, the most accurate historical descriptions will always win in the end, sifted through years of debate, archeology and research.

    Take a local example, there might be a political meaning today for UMNO to present post-WW2 Malaysian history in a certain skewed or biased way. Some people might even have an interest in presenting the Islamisation of the Malay world in a certain way, since it still has some political meaning. One could also argue that scientific debate about Malaysia's recent history is somewhat supressed, that funds are not allocated to those that have views differing from the 'official line' etc. But give it another 500 years, I do not think that this meaning has any importance whatsoever anymore, so science (and hence the closest approximation of the truth that can be obtained) will always win in the end. There will come a time when 20th century history is reevaluated and debated.
    See you...

    Isa Rahim

  13. #103
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    thats what i meant history is never a straight forward subject.

  14. #104
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    While browsing in a bookshop trying to look intelligent, I came upon a book on sexology called "The Lost Jewel" [translated from the Malay Language] by Ibnu Yusof. The most interesting aspect of the book that caught my eye was not about sex but what background research he had done pertaining to the roots of the Malays. The findings of his research I translated here are noted below:

    The researcher mentioned that according to Ibn Al-Athir, the famous medieval Islamic historian, the Malay race originates from descendents of Prophet Abraham. They were then known as the Jawi Clan, descendents of Prophet Abraham by way of his third wife, Qatura. They were directed by His Highness to emigrate to the east and having adequately supplied them with the necessities to begin a new life, they headed eastwards. They settled from one place to another, migrating further east probably for a number of reasons. It is said that they formerly settled in Tibet and named the Himalayas after them for in Sanskrit, “Himalayas” mean Malay Mountain. That was supposed to have occurred 2000 years ago. Due to endless wars on Chinese and Indian soil, it is said that they eventually migrated to the south where they ultimately settled down at Southern Thailand and Peninsular Malaysia. This incidentally was the land route.

    Another Jawi group, headed by a king named Mus, apparently took the sea route and sailed eastward where he ultimately landed at Palembang, Sumatra, Indonesia. A local river there, Musi River meaning Mus’s River seems to make reference of his arrival at Palembang.

    It is said that Prophet Abraham bore three large generations: firstly, the Arabs from Ishmael, secondly, the Jews from Isaac and thirdly, the Jawi/Malays from his children by way of Qatura. Ever since, the Arabs have called the Malay Archipelago as the Jawi land.

    As a result of the long journey, the Malays acquired numerous knowledge and assimilated many traditions along the way, much of which are closely related to Indian, Chinese and Japanese background. [China and Japanese were added to the list as a result of Budi Dharma, a then Malay traveler who went around disseminating his worldly knowledge].
    ______________________________________
    Although the closest link to this research is that "Jawi" is the writing medium traditionally used by Malays, I found it puzzling how the name of the "Jawi" changed to "Malay" in Sanskrit whilst in Tibet.

    Well, that's all I know. Excuse me while I flip through the other pages of the Lost Jewel...mmm, also very interesting.

  15. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by badaveil
    The researcher mentioned that according to Ibn Al-Athir, the famous medieval Islamic historian, the Malay race originates from descendents of Prophet Abraham. They were then known as the Jawi Clan, descendents of Prophet Abraham by way of his third wife, Qatura.
    Unfortunately, there is no evidence whatsoever to support Ibn Al-Athir's claim. On the contrary, both archeological evidence and DNA analysis indicate a rather different origin. Read this thread from the start.
    See you...

    Isa Rahim

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