Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 42 of 42

Thread: Any recommendation for a good Skin Specialist around SJ?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USJ33
    Posts
    430
    Hi Tham, thanks for the information. I am now trying Neem leaves and tumeric paste (blended), so far so good.
    At the same time, also taking Omega 3, Olive, Zinc and glucosamine, ah, yes, I have psoriatic arthritis now.

    Speaking of Humira, according to the doctor, there is no side effect , googled and the side effects are like you mentioned, higher risk of getting cancer.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sri Hartamas, Kuala Lumpur
    Posts
    281
    Inositol
    Chromium picolinate
    5-HTP
    NAC
    Magnesium threonate
    Fish oil
    Citicoline or Alpha GPC
    SAMe




    Administration of inositol to a patient with bipolar disorder and psoriasis: a case report.

    http://www.casesjournal.com/content/3/1/69




    Inositol as an add-on treatment for bipolar depression.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11254020



    Controlled trials of inositol in psychiatry.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9169302



    Double-blind, controlled, crossover trial of inositol versus
    fluvoxamine for the treatment of panic disorder.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11386498



    Inositol.

    http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=21766#P5



    Mood Disorders: Omega-3, SAMe, and Inositol.

    http://pro.psychcentral.com/2013/moo...ol/001910.html



    Adjunctive nutraceuticals with standard pharmacotherapies in bipolar disorder:
    a systematic review of clinical trials.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22017215



    Nutrient-based therapies for bipolar disorder: a systematic review.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/23147067



    Magnesium and the Brain.

    http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogsp...and-brain.html



    Magnesium could help save baby boomers from mental decline.

    http://www.emaxhealth.com/11402/magn...mental-decline



    Magnesium May Improve Memory.

    http://www.webmd.com/brain/news/2010...improve-memory


    Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Brain Volume
    While Reversing Many Aspects of Neurologic Aging:
    A Novel Intervention for Bipolar Disorder.

    http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2010/...ch&key=bipolar



    Vitamin and mineral intakes in adults with mood disorders: comparisons to nutrition standards and associations with sociodemographic and clinical variables.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22331690



    The beneficial effects of the herbal medicine Free and Easy Wanderer Plus (FEWP)
    for mood disorders: double-blind, placebo-controlled studies.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17010995



    '' Free & Easy Wanderer Plus ''

    http://www.activeherb.com/jwxiaoyao/

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sri Hartamas, Kuala Lumpur
    Posts
    281
    Renal Cell Carcinoma In A Patient With Rheumatoid
    Arthritis Treated With Adalimumab.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/24191905



    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma triggered by adalimumab.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/23911677



    Metastatic melanoma in a young woman treated with
    TNF-α inhibitor for psoriatic arthritis: a case report.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22129323/



    Multiple eruptive squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with chronic
    plaque psoriasis on adalimumab.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22758905/



    Development of two primary malignant melanomas after treatment with adalimumab:
    a case report and review of the possible link between biological therapy with
    TNF-alpha antagonists and melanocytic proliferation.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20484878/




    Eruptive latent metastatic melanomas after initiation of
    antitumor necrosis factor therapies.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17434043/?

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USJ33
    Posts
    430
    Thanks Tham for all the useful information.

    I have another question, can I sue my first skin specialist for misdiagnose and negligence?

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sri Hartamas, Kuala Lumpur
    Posts
    281
    I doubt that would be easy to prove. This is not the US, where everyone seems
    to sue for everything, and they have lawyers there specializing in malpractice cases.

    But why would you want to do that at this difficult time, when you have your
    back to the wall, fighting for survival ?

    Can you afford the legal fees, which would be pointlessly spent since you
    are likely to lose the case ? And I doubt if you can find any lawyers here
    to take the case.

    He wasn't really negligent, just that he diagnosed it as eczema to the best of
    his knowledge and experience.

    Use your time and effort to research supplements and drugs for your condition.
    I have already given you the info on those that I know of, which will be likely to help.

    Like for a start, go to your friendly pharmacy, buy some generic pentoxifylline,
    about a dollar each, and pop in one daily for a start, with food.

    Despite some negative trials, I think the science behind it is likely to be of some
    benefit to you over time.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USJ33
    Posts
    430
    Quote Originally Posted by Tham View Post
    I doubt that would be easy to prove. This is not the US, where everyone seems
    to sue for everything, and they have lawyers there specializing in malpractice cases.

    But why would you want to do that at this difficult time, when you have your
    back to the wall, fighting for survival ?

    Can you afford the legal fees, which would be pointlessly spent since you
    are likely to lose the case ? And I doubt if you can find any lawyers here
    to take the case.

    He wasn't really negligent, just that he diagnosed it as eczema to the best of
    his knowledge and experience.

    Use your time and effort to research supplements and drugs for your condition.
    I have already given you the info on those that I know of, which will be likely to help.

    Like for a start, go to your friendly pharmacy, buy some generic pentoxifylline,
    about a dollar each, and pop in one daily for a start, with food.

    Despite some negative trials, I think the science behind it is likely to be of some
    benefit to you over time.
    The reason why I want to sue is, if it is not because of the misdiagnose, my condition would not be this bad.
    It has affected me badly, physcially, socially, mentally (my depression relapsed) and now I lost my job

    Another reason is to let the doctor know that don't just use the magnifying glass for 5 seconds and came out with the diagnosis.

    During my 4th visit, where I got my steroids injection, my conditions were bad enough to tell that it is not eczema, why did he still prescribed me oral steroids?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sri Hartamas, Kuala Lumpur
    Posts
    281
    That's because psoriasis, with its many types, some very similar looking
    to eczema, is not easy to diagnose.

    This girl on this forum, Miss Minni, was initially diagnosed with eczema, put
    on steroids, then thought to be dermatitis herpetiformis, and finally psoriasis
    after two years.

    http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic...ost__p__368266


    As you can read on her post, oral calcitriol (Rocaltrol), which is basically the
    second metabolite of vitamin D3, also helps.

    You could try say 0.25 mg three times a week.

    Avoid chocolate and go on a gluten-free diet.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USJ33
    Posts
    430
    Dear All, check this out https://www.facebook.com/LuqmanHerbsCentre, ayurmedic, he treats all kind of health problems, not just psoriasis.
    I went to see him last sat, so today is day no. 4, too early to tell but I am feeling good.

    Not promoting anything here, just sharing.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    subang jaya
    Posts
    11
    Diploma in dermatology from NUs and Malaysia is not recognised as a specialist in skin,need to qualify in MRCP from U.K. to become specialist.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    subang jaya
    Posts
    11
    Dr Christina Chea is not a skin specialist,done small diploma from Singapore,not recognised as specialiat.You will not find her name in the Malaysian Specialist Register and is not a member of the Persatuan Dermatologi Malaysia,where all the dermatologist are listed.The last time my neighbour went to see Dr Christina Chea for psoriasis she also precsribed steroids.Since she is not a specilaist she should not comment on a senior Dermatologist who is the best.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    subang jaya
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by blackgammon View Post
    another note: I went to Dr Christina Chea to get some anti-histamine and she was surprised that I was prescribed steroids by Dr. ranjit!
    She said steroids is a No-No for Psoriasis.
    Dr Christina Chea is not a skin specialist,just a normal G.P.,a small diploma from Singapore is not recognised as skin speilaist,she should pass an expert opinion,I have been to Dr ranjit many times for my psoriasis he always explains every patient and i never was given steroids for my psoriasis.In fact my neighbouir who went to see the so called skin specialist in tiapan USJ was given steroids for psoriasis.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USJ33
    Posts
    430
    Hi All, I found this thread, you guys might want to have a look.

    http://www.lawyerment.com.my/boards/...age=0&Session=

    He or She seems to have the same misdiagnosis issue but S/he took one step further.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •