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Thread: Sri Emas Private school-any good?

  1. #1
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    Sri Emas Private school-any good?

    Someone recommended me this private school for my children. Suppose to be good
    Any one has a comment?

  2. #2
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    Never heard before, googled also no result. Where about is it?

  3. #3
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    If within usj, Fairview is opening it's doors at Taman Perindustrian coming September...further info..they are focusing on IB program.

  4. #4
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    The term "good" is relative in this case. Does it mean that the private school system give your children a better, well rounded education? Do the teachers interact well with your children? When your child passes through their system does he/she have the upward mobility to enroll in colleges or universities of your choosing? Or is it that it is just an alternative to the national system? Ask yourself first before embarking on this important decision.

    Check the school's status properly. I was formerly the Principal of two private schools and I can tell you that getting quality teachers is an issue with private schools. The need to secure good profits make them pay low salaries to teachers. As a result, non-trained teachers usually make up most of the teaching staff. Trained teachers would demand higher pay and consequently reduce company profits. Those schools that can afford trained teachers (usually retired teachers) and pay them well, will charge you higher fees. Teachers in private schools are usually overworked and stressed out because of demands by the company to secure "good" results at all times as this is their selling point. You can get good feed back from parents who send their children to these schools and not rely on the schools' administration during so called open days.

    Sometimes, it is still better to enroll your children in national schools - at least the teachers are trained and they follow the national curriculum. All my three children follow the national curriculum and they are quite successful now. If you enroll your children in the private school system..you may be stuck in the system if you don't like it and may find it difficult to switch back to the national system again...unless, of course, you are already disenchanted with the national system.
    Mastering modern technology is easy; even a Neanderthal can do it...” Besitai 2012

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by besitai2007
    The term "good" is relative in this case. Does it mean that the private school system give your children a better, well rounded education? Do the teachers interact well with your children? When your child passes through their system does he/she have the upward mobility to enroll in colleges or universities of your choosing? Or is it that it is just an alternative to the national system? Ask yourself first before embarking on this important decision.

    Check the school's status properly. I was formerly the Principal of two private schools and I can tell you that getting quality teachers is an issue with private schools. The need to secure good profits make them pay low salaries to teachers. As a result, non-trained teachers usually make up most of the teaching staff. Trained teachers would demand higher pay and consequently reduce company profits. Those schools that can afford trained teachers (usually retired teachers) and pay them well, will charge you higher fees. Teachers in private schools are usually overworked and stressed out because of demands by the company to secure "good" results at all times as this is their selling point. You can get good feed back from parents who send their children to these schools and not rely on the schools' administration during so called open days.

    Sometimes, it is still better to enroll your children in national schools - at least the teachers are trained and they follow the national curriculum. All my three children follow the national curriculum and they are quite successful now. If you enroll your children in the private school system..you may be stuck in the system if you don't like it and may find it difficult to switch back to the national system again...unless, of course, you are already disenchanted with the national system.
    One of my child is in a private school and the other is in national school.
    Both are not even average in class..lingering at the bottom half of the class.
    We are both sucessful as managers in large companies and trys to spend as much time with them as possible. We are thinking that we are not strict enough with our children as we are quite modern in our outlook. Somehow, our children don't take us seriously.
    For example, it took them a year to learn how to swim and not until I change their instructor to a very strict discplinarian, both have become competent swimmers. Somehow, soft-soft approach does not work with them.

    Do you mind if I ask you if you were a strict parent? How can we be a good disciplinarian and a great motivator?Care to share some scenarios so we know where we have gone wrong. Both of us are alpha type characters.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey01
    Never heard before, googled also no result. Where about is it?
    Haha...good point..I have no idea..I am disappointed that there is no information or a website...I am not sending my children there if they don't even have a proper website..sounds like bomoh education to me..

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahtal68
    If within usj, Fairview is opening it's doors at Taman Perindustrian coming September...further info..they are focusing on IB program.
    Ok, will check this out...i.e google it..thanks!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat Bruce
    Do you mind if I ask you if you were a strict parent? How can we be a good disciplinarian and a great motivator?Care to share some scenarios so we know where we have gone wrong. Both of us are alpha type characters.
    Schools, whether private or national type, provide the means (or tools, if you like) for a child to be educated (in the full sense of the word). They do not automatically churn out geniuses. Some parents are of the wrong view that by putting a child in a good school, their child will automatically be geniuses. It comes down to a child's potential - whether she/he will be a doctor, engineer or a simple clerk. Parents' expectations must be realistic.

    My three children were educated in national schools and are entirely different in their interests and abilities. Some arm twisting can help but you cannot force a child to do what he/she doesn't like. Proper guidance and knowing when to ease off is the key. My two daughters are straight A students. My youngest, my son, is entirely different.

    My eldest is a journalist after graduating as a mass com graduate from Curtin University in Australia and is now working for a well-known local newspaper. She enjoys her work as she loved to write when she was in school and won essay prizes. Now, she gets to travel all over the world (like US, Japan, HK, Korea, UK, Europe) to interview well-known people (like Pierce Brosnan and Ricky Martin, the singer) and write feature articles for her newspaper. My wife and I thought she could be a lawyer or even a doctor but she chose the career path herself and we supported her.

    My second daughter is a Business Administration graduate from a local college twinning program and is at the moment working in Los Angeles with Barnes and Nobel Bookstore. She was the top arts student in her school when she completed her SPM. She likes to read a lot and always has a book in her hand wherever she goes. Working with Barnes and Nobel is a dream for her as she gets to read all the books she wants and at the same type be paid for her job. In her case, I gave her the encouragement and support throughout her schooling and never pressured her.

    My youngest child, my son, was a little enigmatic. He could not speak till the age of four! He had a language of his own and we were worried that he had a learning disability. Somehow, it was due to the period where I had to work in Malacca as a school senior assistant and could only come back during weekends. My wife was also working then and he was left to the care of a child minder and his sisters. I tried to make up for lost time by communicating with him more. His first few years in primary school was not spectacular as he had problems coping with the Malay language. I tried to help him along as much as I could but ensuring that he still enjoyed his childhood. He did, in fact, enjoyed it a bit too much and broke his arms by landing on them when descending from a monkey bar in the playground. He broke his left wrist, left humerus and right elbow. The stupid surgeons who mended him at a private hospital in Subang didn't do a good job. His right elbow is twisted at a strange angle so that when he hits a badminton shuttle it looks weird to his opponent! His progress through primary school and lower secondary school was not spectacular and he barely made the grades. I was resigned to the fact that he was meant for a non-academic career. Somehow, during upper secondary school he managed to cope and got two distinctions in the SPM - A1 in English and A2 in Mathematics with credit threes in the other subjects. To me, that was wonderful as I did not expect too much from him. My son loved playing computer games. He enrolled in One Academy College and did spectacularly in IT animation and design. He has graduated and is today working with an IT company, designing computer games. To me, that is a wonderful achievement, given his background.

    If you asked me if my children are successful, I would say, yes, as they are in the careers of their own choosing. I just gave the necessary input of encouragement and support and helped them along. I do not want them to blame me for pushing them into careers they dislike. As a parent, I would like them to achieve greater things but as long as they are happy in the careers of their choosing, I feel that I have done my best as a parent. Was I a strict disciplinarian? No, I was not, but was firm in my commitment to their success.

    Sorry for this long input. Hope this answers your question.
    Mastering modern technology is easy; even a Neanderthal can do it...” Besitai 2012

  9. #9
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    Besitai, thanks for sharing and congrats - that's successful parenting. Glad your kids found their direction.
    Identifying the core nature of the child and nurture that to maximise their potential is so so key, yet we are often caught in the rat-race to fit them in odd places.

    I too have been trying to identify what works for the kids. All boys are crazy of computer games .. surely, can't be just that ?? With so much distractions, sometimes, the kids do not find their hidden potential in other areas.

    I suppose time and patience will tell. Just be open-minded.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat Bruce
    One of my child is in a private school and the other is in national school.
    Both are not even average in class..lingering at the bottom half of the class.
    We are both sucessful as managers in large companies and trys to spend as much time with them as possible. We are thinking that we are not strict enough with our children as we are quite modern in our outlook. Somehow, our children don't take us seriously.
    For example, it took them a year to learn how to swim and not until I change their instructor to a very strict discplinarian, both have become competent swimmers. Somehow, soft-soft approach does not work with them.

    Do you mind if I ask you if you were a strict parent? How can we be a good disciplinarian and a great motivator?Care to share some scenarios so we know where we have gone wrong. Both of us are alpha type characters.
    I don't have any good or success stories.
    Human beings are very complex and it is not easy to find out what makes a person ticks especially where situations are not that obvious.
    Sometimes in almost the exact conditions, one child can turn out to be very successful, while another failed miserably.

    Whenever there are signs of poor performances, it may be wise to test whether there are any learning disabilities, such as mild dyslexic, ADD, anything physical or mental that is hindering one's learning abilities.
    If the problem is obvious (i.e. not mild) it would have been detected earlier, the milder problems are more difficult to correlate with learning issues.

    Once we have cleared the above, then we may attempt to match parental, learning styles with personality or motivational traits.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat Bruce
    Ok, will check this out...i.e google it..thanks!
    Mat Bruce, have you found out anything worth updating here?

  12. #12
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    I have two hyperactive children who is studying in Chinese SRK. More homework there to keep them busy and I think Mandarin is important especially when it is time for them to go back to USA while in thier teens.

    Have just found e learning program to keep them busy and scoring marks in the exam orientated systems in our school system. It is great as I can check whether they have spend the time doing it, and there is grading after the end of each sessions. And it is relative inexpensive. In fact, because of this program, I stopped the tuition class where I paid Rm300 per month whereas the e learning cost me afraction of that and gives better value and sumore I can monitor thier progress or if they are actually doing the homework.

    Success story? Only time would tell -they are having exam now and the result would be known later whether it is a good investmnet or not.

    But seriously if I can afford I would send them to the International Schools where usually the qualities of teachers is not compromised as in many private school or govt school and the emphasis is not based on exam orientated but rather on stimulating up thier potentials and conceptual thinking.

  13. #13
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    Any idea where's the nearest International school in USJ for primary 1?

    Or any recommended private school?

  14. #14
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    Sri emas is actually run by ace edventure. They have a tuition based IGCSE class ( Sirius Scholar) in Usj1. Sri emas is their international school . It will be in kelana jaya ( near nanyang siang pau) next year. Currently Sri Emas is in Goodyear court 5.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by evan1222
    Any idea where's the nearest International school in USJ for primary 1?

    Or any recommended private school?
    Fiarview International School in USJ.
    A wise man refrains from talking but a fool utters rubbish.

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