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Thread: How To Make Home Cooler

  1. #46
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    Jul 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikasa
    hi,
    use vertirator, not bad....

    PM me
    My friend told me it is not as effective as rockwool or cellulose insulation.

    After sometime it got jam if not properly installed and over time the track collects dust and it turns slowly if wind current is not big enough. Rate of extraction of hot air is too slow compare to the volume of hot air in the roof.

    What is your opinion?

  2. #47
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    Hope you all understand this: with insulation the interior temp can drop significantly to be just in the comfort zone but don't expect it as if your home is in Cameron Highlands or like the air con is switched on. We live in a relatively hot and humid climate...period.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by bslee
    Hope you all understand this: with insulation the interior temp can drop significantly to be just in the comfort zone but don't expect it as if your home is in Cameron Highlands or like the air con is switched on. We live in a relatively hot and humid climate...period.
    I absolutely agreed with you.

    Many misunderstand about insulation. I think the maximum you may drop is up to 28-29 deg. celcius and at that level with fan alone one should feel very comfortable. (visit www.cetdem.org.my)

    CETDEM has advised us to use air cond. wisely to play a role in saving the mother nature.

  4. #49
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    Aug 2009
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    I am glad its cooler now and the focus is gone of this thread but I have a particular interest in the subject.

    The energy performance of houses is a very current subject in Europe as they say that 20% of all carbon emissions are as a result of domestic usage .. heating lighting cooking etc.

    Here in Malaysia not very much attention is paid to this subject and what attention there is appears to be misdirected.

    a recent study of a specially built house in Melaka showed some interesting results for example:

    The "heat gain" (effect on cooling load) of a house through the various types of roof materials was said to be insignificant

    The heat gain attributable to ceilings insulated or uninsulated was said also to be insignificant.

    The major reductions of cooling load were found by insulating the walls and double or triple glazing the windows. Also reducing the air infiltration and floor insulation showed savings too.

    The fact that the heat gains were reduced meant that saving on cooling loads using air conditioners could be had which in some cases were quite significant.

    putting in ceiling insulation cannot magically reduce the temperature in the room(s) below because the flow of hot air is upwards.

    BMW9700 was correct .. the traditional Malay house builders built high pitched roofs with vents to let out the hot air and replace it with cooler air the material the house were made of provided good insulation and they used shading to minimise solar gain.

    keep cool

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tong
    BMW9700 was correct .. the traditional Malay house builders built high pitched roofs with vents to let out the hot air and replace it with cooler air the material the house were made of provided good insulation and they used shading to minimise solar gain.
    keep cool
    You're right only to some extent. Yes, TRADITIONAL houses IF built with traditional materials. Many Malay homes in rural areas are with ZINC or Abestos sheet roofing. The former will make the house in a virtual sauna and oven. Atap roof was really cool, but where the heck you wanna find this material again?. I can tell you YOU SWEAT like hell in a house with ZINC roof. Stand outside in the scorching sunlight and its much cooler I kid you not!.
    I know cos I experience this often long ago at another rural town.

  6. #51
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    Sep 2009
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    Kuala Lumpur
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    Misleading Information

    I have been in the insulation field for more than 30 years from industrial insulation to home insulation. Below are my comments:

    Cellulose is NOT the world’s most environmentally friendly insulation product. The environmental impact is similar to many other insulation products, the insulation properties are worse than mineral wool (glasswool/rockwool), it is combustible, it absorbs water and moisture and it contains chemicals that are problematic.

    Cellulose is just another insulation material with some plusses, some minuses and some special properties. These special properties are mostly a problem - like the absorption of humidity and water, but are marketed as a benefit.

    In a full lifecycle perspective Cellulose has an energy use and emissions similar to mineral wool- Glass and Rock- except for Global warming (CO2)- where the emissions are ca 60-70% if we assume that all Cellulose is either burnt after use or decompose 100% aerobically in landfill. If Cellulose is put into a landfill, it will decompose and emit emissions to soil, water and air. Contrary to what they state in the ad, some- maybe 10-20% of the cellulose will develop into Methane- (Anaerobic). As Methane has a global warming potential 20-22 times CO2, this alone will make Cellulose emit more greenhouse gases than comparable amounts of Mineral wool. This is well documented.

    It is a FALSE argument that all insulation materials have an environmental payback many times the cost to make them.

    Finally Cellulose forgets to mention that it contains a flame retarder/ biocide - usually (Boric Acid and Borax)- Check this - 5-20% by weight. The Boron materials work both as flame retarder insect poison and and mold protection. Borax and Boric Acid are labelled as harmful to reproduction in the EU From January 2009.

    Finally I think it is slightly hazardous to sell moisture absorbing materials in a climate like Malaysia?

    In conclusion, glass wool are generally used internally / home and rock wool are used externally / industrial. Cellulose should not be preferred if other better alternative like mineral wools are available in high humidity country like Malaysia. I think you should check www.mimg.org.my for more accurate and accountable information.

  7. #52
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    Misleading Information

    Misleading Information

    I have installed cellulose insulation to my house since 2 years ago and to date it still performs to my satisfaction. Being a fair customer, I have a few words to say on behalf of my installer. This forum provides a platform for us to express our views on different products and it is unethical to condemn other manufacturer’s products here since every material has its advantages and disadvantages. One must understand no material is perfect.

    Cellulose has been in use for the past 50 years in overseas and I believed if the product do not have its plus points , it may not last until today. (www.cellulose.org) Similarly to other insulation materials.

    Cellulose is a recycled product and it is misleading to assume on its emissions of gases etc IF it goes for landfill. It is named the Greenest of The Green Product because of its low embodied energy (http://www.cellulose.org/userdocs/Te...enBuilding.pdf)

    I have done enough research before decided to insulate my house using cellulose insulation. Other insulation materials may use FORMALDEHYDE in the manufacturing process which is harmful to health (www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/pr/2004/pr153.html). However, it is a matter of amount of usage if it complies to the requirement of statutory bodies to ensure it is not hazardous to consumers’ health. Again that applies to other insulation materials.

    Cellulose does absorb moisture but it is mold resistant in view of its boric acid contents. But according to the installer it dries up fast in view of its material nature. There are other insulation materials which also absorbs moisture but not mold resistant and might lose its performance over time especially in air conditioned rooms as shown in the image below. The mold / fungus grown might be hazardous.

    CIMG1439R.jpg

    Cellulose were put in good use for keeping house warm (in winter) and cool (in summer) in western countries with four seasons. The question of moisture absorption should be negligible viewing its wide usage in western countries in keeping house warm during winter.

    However, the decision on the type of insulation materials to be used is still at the discretion of the consumers.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Kuala lumpur
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peaceguy View Post
    Misleading Information

    Cellulose does absorb moisture but it is mold resistant in view of its boric acid contents. But according to the installer it dries up fast in view of its material nature. There are other insulation materials which also absorbs moisture but not mold resistant and might lose its performance over time especially in air conditioned rooms as shown in the image below. The mold / fungus grown might be hazardous.

    CIMG1439R.jpg

    Cellulose were put in good use for keeping house warm (in winter) and cool (in summer) in western countries with four seasons. The question of moisture absorption should be negligible viewing its wide usage in western countries in keeping house warm during winter.

    However, the decision on the type of insulation materials to be used is still at the discretion of the consumers.
    For information, cellulose can be applied by mixing with water i.e. wet spray method and sandwiched in between two wall panels for dry wall construction which is getting very common nowadays(http://youtu.be/zFBVc8S6cJo)
    The performance of cellulose is not affected after it is dried.

    As for home thermal insulation where cellulose are laid on top of the ceiling, there won't be any moisture in the attic or between roof and ceiling as these areas are always hot and dry due to weather conditions in Malaysia.Therefore concern of grown of fungus / mold for cellulose insulation in attic or ceiling shouldn't arise.Anywhere it is mold resistant unlike other insulation materials.

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