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jadewhite
13-10-2011, 10:58 PM
I just had my garden refreshed with new trees. But, sadly on the 3rd day all the leaves started to dried up. One of the trees just goes naked, leaving behind its branches minus the leaves.

The landscaper told me it's normal. The leaves will grow back but I am sceptical. And, I was asked to water the plants twice a day. Is it normal?

lady-o-leisure
14-10-2011, 03:17 PM
Did u transplant trees from a pot into the ground? If you did that, then you;d have to water it a lot after you transplant it. Hubby always leaves the hose running for a while... and it will almost drown the plant, but that is to ensure it is getting enough water and all the soil packs in good.

xinrong
14-10-2011, 04:22 PM
Did u transplant trees from a pot into the ground? If you did that, then you;d have to water it a lot after you transplant it. Hubby always leaves the hose running for a while... and it will almost drown the plant, but that is to ensure it is getting enough water and all the soil packs in good.

I used to do that but it didn't do the plants any good or does it apply to certain plants only? I was told by the nursery owner that plants are already traumatised by their move from pot to ground so better not to water too much first...

jadewhite
15-10-2011, 09:20 PM
New plants from nursery but when it arrived it looks so sad :( . The gardener told me it is okay and the leaves will grow. From a rasional point of view, if the plants arrived half dead most probably it will not survive.

The other two trees which arrived with green leaves, started to dried up and one of it became naked. :mad: Been watering loads of water and still it is of no help. Haizzzz .

Any recommendation of gardener?

Naka
16-10-2011, 04:58 AM
I also have this problem when I moved my Tahiti lime from a big pot into the ground.

All the older leaves started to go yellow & eventually all dropped. :eek:

However newer leaves appear & hopefully they stay :D

In the meantime, I keep watering it twice a day

kwchang
16-10-2011, 03:40 PM
When you replant a tree, you need to remove it from its original position and taking it off the pot is one of the ways. Usually, the removal means you disturb the soil it is rooted on. Most of the fine and live roots are around the periphery of the root mass and this is the part that gets damaged in the replanting process.

Once the rootlets and root-hairs get damaged, you deprive the plant of a massive part of its root system that imbibe water and nutrients. when you replant with all the foliage intact, you allow the tree to continue to have its original water demand because the existing leaves will continue to draw water from its veins and so make a huge demand on its root system ...which by the way is damaged in the replanting process. The end result is leaves dropping due to the lack of water in the tree's water supply

Did you notice that when they replant trees on the roadsides, the leaves of the replanted tree are drastically reduced? This helps to reduce the water demand.

Hence if you replant a tree with full foliage, do trim the tree. it will not harm the tree but in fact help it tide over the initial trauma of lost roots. Give it time to regrow the root hairs and rootlets and the buds in the stem will sprout new leaves in no time. if you left the original leaves intact, they will draw upon water which are not forthcoming and you could cause real stress on the veins in the tree's water system

CS Chua
16-10-2011, 06:40 PM
I bought a sour sop plant, about 4 ft high and it is doing OK. No leaves drop. Hardly water it as it has been raining cats and dogs. I had a mango tree in a pot for about 4 years, bearing good mangoes annually. 2 years ago I transplanted it into my garden and it has grown into a big tree.

There could be any numbers of reasons why jadewhite's tree did not do well and I will suspect the nursery first before anything else. If she has been consistent with her watering, it should not dried up. Even a poor soil condition will only see the tree "suffering" but not naked and dried up. Better ask them to replace the tree, if I were you.

jadewhite
17-10-2011, 11:31 PM
The plants are watered on a regular basis. As a matter of fact, when it first arrived I was quite taken aback. 40% of the plants are yellowish in colour and most of it looks so sad. The Landscaper told me, this is normal as the plants has to travel far.

I have requested for an exchange. And, still waiting!

cpleong
19-10-2011, 08:02 PM
Jade,
You should have rejected the whole lot when they arrived.

Coupled with the extremely hot weather (before these rainy days), the plants have no chance to survive if they are not tip top condition to start with, especially when transplanted.

I think you did the right thing finally, which is to ask for a full exchange of plants.

Cheers and goodluck.

lady-o-leisure
21-10-2011, 04:31 AM
When removing the plant from its original pot, try not to break off all the soil that it came in. Leave everything intact, that way the roots will not be disturbed much. Replant the entire thing into the hole, and cover up with good soil, pack it all in and water it lots. Anyway, we buy the plants and transport them home by ourselves so we are sure they weren't mistreated during transportation.

jadewhite
23-10-2011, 10:24 PM
@ CP. No luck. The landscaper has decided not to replace the plants. :mad: Not only that, the grasses has started to look sad too.

@ lady-o-leisure. Thanks! Now I know why the plants and trees are misbehaving. They did not replant the entire plant in the soil.

Gosh! I may need to replant all of it.