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bugbear
23-01-2010, 12:24 PM
I don't know about you guys but there will come a time when there will be surplusses of doctors at the rate of how things are going on lately. Already there are hundreds of medical colleges prouting up all over in Malaysia. With the dubious teaching staffs available to teach these young medical students, i am afraid the quality of medical grads in time to come will suffer in term of quality.

I have seen many of these interns in our local hospitals undergoing training in housemanship. Some can't even present their case in a proper manner much less discuss specific illness in an interligent manner which is quite sad really. It has been projected that Malaysia will swarmed by at least 6-7 thousands of these doctors in the coming years making compulsory services redundance. We may decry the lack of doctors at the moment but at what we will see later on will be really shocking. Think about it, with the abolition of compulsory services, most of these doctors will be pushed into private services like GPs which might be good news for some as there will be lots of GPs to choose from albeit inexperience ones. Government services will be seen as gold then.

I urge the MMC to restrict the issuing of licences to all and sundry to open medical colleges in order to save guard quality in this profession for our sake.

jan tomaswaki
23-01-2010, 12:34 PM
surpluss good mah ! can be more competitive, then a by- pass will have to click to the web site for offer RM9.90 ,cancer stage 1 RM6.90 and cancer Stage 4 RM69.90 and pay by credit card can redeem points to change for Vit pills or packet herbal tea and lucky draw for first price is free coffin :D :eek:

Naka
23-01-2010, 01:43 PM
I don't know about you guys but there will come a time when there will be surplusses of doctors at the rate of how things are going on lately. Already there are hundreds of medical colleges prouting up all over in Malaysia. With the dubious teaching staffs available to teach these young medical students, i am afraid the quality of medical grads in time to come will suffer in term of quality.

I have seen many of these interns in our local hospitals undergoing training in housemanship. Some can't even present their case in a proper manner much less discuss specific illness in an interligent manner which is quite sad really. It has been projected that Malaysia will swarmed by at least 6-7 thousands of these doctors in the coming years making compulsory services redundance. We may decry the lack of doctors at the moment but at what we will see later on will be really shocking. Think about it, with the abolition of compulsory services, most of these doctors will be pushed into private services like GPs which might be good news for some as there will be lots of GPs to choose from albeit inexperience ones. Government services will be seen as gold then.

I urge the MMC to restrict the issuing of licences to all and sundry to open medical colleges in order to save guard quality in this profession for our sake.

Did you say over 100 Medical Colleges?

Where?

yvonnefoong
24-01-2010, 10:29 AM
I have been thinking about the same thing. It started with more and more nursing courses.

Surplus in terms of economics might seem good. But massification of education forces quality down.

Russia might be an appropriate example. Almost everyone is a doctor but their skills are old-school from what I heard.

I have been thinking about the US institution I have my surgery at, the House Ear Institute. They have residency and fellowship programs where doctors can come in to work and learn with the surgeons. The last time I was there, a young Asian Chinese doctor named Adeline was learning from my surgeon Dr. Lekovic. She helped him monitor me in the ward and later removed my staples that held my wound shut too.

I was thinking, if our government would send students to learn at HEI, that will benefit mant NF patients in Malaysia.

If I am not mistaken, students receive a stippend as fellows and residents. But the student needs to afford his or her own living expenses - That's where our government can support them.

bugbear
24-01-2010, 11:51 AM
I have been thinking about the same thing. It started with more and more nursing courses.

Surplus in terms of economics might seem good. But massification of education forces quality down.

Russia might be an appropriate example. Almost everyone is a doctor but their skills are old-school from what I heard.

I have been thinking about the US institution I have my surgery at, the House Ear Institute. They have residency and fellowship programs where doctors can come in to work and learn with the surgeons. The last time I was there, a young Asian Chinese doctor named Adeline was learning from my surgeon Dr. Lekovic. She helped him monitor me in the ward and later removed my staples that held my wound shut too.

I was thinking, if our government would send students to learn at HEI, that will benefit mant NF patients in Malaysia.

If I am not mistaken, students receive a stippend as fellows and residents. But the student needs to afford his or her own living expenses - That's where our government can support them.
You echo my sentiment exactly. Soon we might become like another India or the Philippine where doctors change profession to nurses because almost everyone is a doctors it seems. :eek:

Mat Bruce
24-01-2010, 03:26 PM
Sigh....I reckon they should all be sent to a western country for 5 years ,if they still survive without being sued for negligence, then that is the quality we want in Malaysia.
Otherwise I can just print the certicates at home and give to them, it will be free..what-lah!

bugbear
24-01-2010, 04:15 PM
Did you say over 100 Medical Colleges?

Where?
That is as a figure of speech. I do not have the number but we are looking at increasingly bad figure. What I am getting at is the training of the potential grads and not the number. In UMS, most of the medical lecturers are Burmese who have difficulty in conversing in English. Care to see what will happen to our future grads? :confused:

tictactoe
24-01-2010, 04:16 PM
My biggest worry is how many of these medical undergrds really want to be doctors. Imagine the kind of doctor they become if they join the profession due to parental pressure, imagined glamour etc.? To be a good doctor needs DEDICATION. Let me relate this, I was with my hubby at the Russian Embasssy to make his business visa. There were quite a number of medical students going to Russia making their student visa there. Nearly all of them were giggling kids who cannot understand repeated instructions from the very patient lady at the reception explaining the documents and procedures necessary ( and their exam results from wht I saw was horrible ). What takes the cake was there was this couple (parents) getting all frazzled coz their son missed the 1st week of his final year (the semester has already started)as his documentation are not in order - where is their son? Was he at the embassy? NO! HE was at home SLEEPING! While his parents are there sweating buckets trying to do his visa! Do you think he is interested at all, or his parents are the ones who want a doc in the family?

Hiliary
24-01-2010, 05:21 PM
I think doctors should be forced to have an offical notice in their office for at least their first 5 years after qualifying that states their position in their final exams.

Who wants a doctor that was at the bottom of his class?

cskok8
24-01-2010, 08:30 PM
I am glad this topic came up. Among the medical fraternity it is well known that we are going to have a surplus of doctors soon. And that the quality of new doctors and specialists are gradually going down the drain. Last year about 3500 housemen joined the Ministry of Health. This year the number is expected to exceed 4000. Bear in mind that there are a few medical colleges which have started operations but have not produced any graduates yet (it takes 5 years; half-baked or not). There are also a few which have been given approval to start but which have not actually done so yet. So I expect in 10 years time the number of new doctors will be more than 5000 a year.

At the moment, the govt hospitals accepting/training housemen are already unable to cope. Hospitals which used to have a total of 40+ housemen at any one time now have that number in one department alone. There are sometimes not enough admissions in one day to allocate one patient to each housemen. Consultants probably would not notice if any one of them disappears for the day!

Per-capita; we have the largest number of medical schools in the world. There must be huge profits to be made in medical education; hence everybody is jumping into it. Even a college which made its reputation turning out large numbers of nurses of dubious quality is also starting a medical course. UTAR is about to start. The military (National Defence University) is also going to start although that is entirely a different story as they need to fill their manpower needs.

The MMC which is supposed to govern the quality of medical courses is dominated by govt nominees, so any college approved by the govt is almost automatically given the MMC stamp as well.

With the mushrooming of medical colleges, where are the teaching staff coming from. Most basic science lecturers would come from countries like Indonesia, Burma, India while the clinical departments would be staffed by part-timers from the government "teaching hospitals" that these colleges are affiliated to. These are specialists/consultants who take on additional teaching duties on top of their routine service work. Most hospitals are not really designed for teaching of medical students. So how to have quality teaching? Your guess is as good as mine.

So what do the public do? I have no answers.

currymee
25-01-2010, 07:41 AM
Well, every Malaysian student after getting 10+ As in SPM wants to be a doctor, so with SPM examinations standard getting "easier" since more than 100+ score straight As - we will have more students per year who wants to be doctors .... Strange, when we compare against other countries, where most top students DO NOT Necesarily wants to be a doctor, hence all fields and sectors get their fair share of "brains" and progress but not in LOP-SIDED Boleh !!!! :D SO, theoretically, we get "SMART" doctors but sadly, half-past-six everything else and that is also kind of a screw-up in Msian education system and eventually, the society and job-market make-up if you ask me !! :eek:

bugbear
25-01-2010, 07:59 AM
Well, every Malaysian student after getting 10+ As in SPM wants to be a doctor, so with SPM examinations standard getting "easier" since more than 100+ score straight As - we will have more students per year who wants to be doctors .... Strange, when we compare against other countries, where most top students DO NOT Necesarily wants to be a doctor, hence all fields and sectors get their fair share of "brains" and progress but not in LOP-SIDED Boleh !!!! :D SO, theoretically, we get "SMART" doctors but sadly, half-past-six everything else and that is also kind of a screw-up in Msian education system and eventually, the society and job-market make-up if you ask me !! :eek:
Let me correct a myth about doctoring. You don't need to be SMART to be a good doctor. You need to have lots of patient, dedication, long suffering, love for humanity, sacrificial love for human and just enough SMART to pull through as a good doctor. This myth is also the one that produce all this lop sided admission to medical colleges in the misguided sense that a medical career is an automatic path to glory and riches. Heck, if I want to be rich I might as well do business or join the bank or something. My cousin is in the banking sector and earning 3-4 times better than me in the government sector. Unless you are hunkering in for the long haul in your journey being doctor, you are gonna be disillusion with the whole mirage of a better life later on.

yvonnefoong
25-01-2010, 12:03 PM
At one of the local colleges I used to attend, lecturers compromised their teaching quality, the depth of their teachings and exam questions, so that students will achieve higher grades and bring up the number of As.

Eventually, the college was awarded University College status.

I got tired of the trend. Since I am also late-deafened and trying to adjust in a classroom with mostly hearing students, the effects of such behaviors coming from lecturers was stressful to me.

The lecturers were like straws and grass being blown by the wind. They adapt not to the student's understanding or coping ability but to what would make the students get As.

As such, I have switched to studying independently through the same university in Iowa insteadf of going through a local college.

Sentinel
25-01-2010, 12:14 PM
Let me correct a myth about doctoring. You don't need to be SMART to be a good doctor. You need to have lots of patient, dedication, long suffering, love for humanity, sacrificial love for human and just enough SMART to pull through as a good doctor. This myth is also the one that produce all this lop sided admission to medical colleges in the misguided sense that a medical career is an automatic path to glory and riches. Heck, if I want to be rich I might as well do business or join the bank or something. My cousin is in the banking sector and earning 3-4 times better than me in the government sector. Unless you are hunkering in for the long haul in your journey being doctor, you are gonna be disillusion with the whole mirage of a better life later on.
When I was in Lower Six. I got admitted into the Science Stream which were covering Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Additional Maths etc...It was dry and boring (although I was from the Science Stream during Forms 4 and 5). So I switched to the Arts Stream, Mum went bonkers and scolded me for 3 days and 3 nights... about how people trying to be engineers and doctors and you just threw it all away....

I silenced her finally with one sentence... "Mum, I had to make a choice. Not everyone can be or want to be a doctor. I can be a doctor but I do not want to be a doctor, I will not be a happy man. Do you want a sad doctor in the house or a happy banker?" The ear-shattering scoldings stopped.

p.s. why then is the dowry for a Ceylonese doctor so much more than a Ceylonese banker, Bugbear?

bugbear
25-01-2010, 02:01 PM
p.s. why then is the dowry for a Ceylonese doctor so much more than a Ceylonese banker, Bugbear?
Again, it is human perception that doctors are kind hearted while the bankers are greedy leeches. How are you feeling sentinel? :D

cskok8
25-01-2010, 03:22 PM
For those studying overseas, it can cost almost RM 1 million and is the worst investment (as far as ROI) you can ever make. Better put the money in a business or property.

Sentinel
25-01-2010, 03:40 PM
Again, it is human perception that doctors are kind hearted while the bankers are greedy leeches. How are you feeling sentinel? :DWell the truth hurts... Ouch!... but I didn't make it as a greedy leech either :D ... I ended as a diabetes mellitus marketer - pushing carbonated soft drinks for 12 years :D .... cukup makan cukup minum...

Mat Bruce
25-01-2010, 10:50 PM
I think doctors should be forced to have an offical notice in their office for at least their first 5 years after qualifying that states their position in their final exams.

Who wants a doctor that was at the bottom of his class?


IMAGINE THIS...this stabbing pain in your chest, your family have taken you to hospital nearby..you feel dizzy,you are being wheeled into the operation room.....and you are about to faint...but you are trying your darn hardest to hang on to consciousnes but you can't be sure how long(in secs) you can hang on..then you see this face of a doctor smiling down at you with a toothy grin..and you remember seeing this face before...the kid that was always at the bottom of your class..and oh no..your worst nightmare and you wished that you had protested earlier about the quality of doctors in usj.com but you did not...while you had the breath and the strength...good luck..you will need it.

kwchang
26-01-2010, 12:35 AM
I wonder how much of your fears of students with low grades are valid.
Firstly, isn't the country acreditating the various University degrees? Isn't there in place some form of system to recognise the various degrees? Where the students come from non-recognised Universities, aren't they not given the Annual Practicing Certificate (APC)? or are they not made to sit an exam to validiate their qualification?

Naka
26-01-2010, 06:55 AM
Maybe because there is this much publicized RM$1.00 Clinic that is on the way. :confused:

bugbear
26-01-2010, 08:13 AM
I wonder how much of your fears of students with low grades are valid.
Firstly, isn't the country acreditating the various University degrees? Isn't there in place some form of system to recognise the various degrees? Where the students come from non-recognised Universities, aren't they not given the Annual Practicing Certificate (APC)? or are they not made to sit an exam to validiate their qualification?
Those are valid questions chang. However in this bolehland money speak loudest and with that any LAN accreditation can be brought. That is what mystifying me especially with the MMC dishing out accreditation left right and center. Oh, by the way the DG of MOH Tan Sri Ismail Merican will net be extended on his tenure anymore. By March he will put out to pasture. I wonder if ..... :confused:

yvonnefoong
26-01-2010, 11:00 AM
It depends on the institutional leadership. They can pressurize lecturers to produce better grades. Lecturers can compromise their teaching quality and the depth of their lessons, and the depth of exams they design by making students regurgitate facts. I have experienced this myself.

Because I am deaf and need to adapt to a classroom for hearing students, when lecturers do that, they stress me out.

After years of trying to cope with this kind of teaching, I decided that enough was enough and switched to studying via Correspondence Courses and Online Courses with Upper Iowa University. After completing two courses this way, I find that I can learn better and more in depthly on my own than trying to learn from some lecturers around here.

One of the colleges I experienced this at was aiming to upgrade itself to University College status.

cskok8
26-01-2010, 03:16 PM
This University College / University status business is pure BS and only done in this country. In many countries there are Colleges and even Schools which award degrees that are ranked higher than any of our universities.

I think Chang you are not getting the point. We are worried about graduates from recognized medical schools in Malaysia WITH MMC registration and APC that are not up to standard.

bugbear
26-01-2010, 04:46 PM
This University College / University status business is pure BS and only done in this country. In many countries there are Colleges and even Schools which award degrees that are ranked higher than any of our universities.

I think Chang you are not getting the point. We are worried about graduates from recognized medical schools in Malaysia WITH MMC registration and APC that are not up to standard.
Right on the nail bro. ;)

yvonnefoong
26-01-2010, 09:44 PM
University College London seems like a good and reputable school.

I wonder if there is anything that can clearly distinguish University Colleges abroad and those in Malaysia. Say, a foreigner coming to Malaysia to study how can he recognize that University Colleges in this country IS NOT like the University Colleges in England?

yvonnefoong
26-01-2010, 09:55 PM
I typed this two days ago but deleted it by mistake. So here I am typing it again.

Few days ago, some friends visited. They brought along a friend. This boy completed two years of a Diploma in Medical Science at one of the local colleges. When the college upgraded itself to University College status, it could start offering degree level study, the MBBS. So now the boy has proceded to the third year of a traditionally five-year MBBS degree with a two year diploma qualification.

He is also fulfilling the practical requirement of his diploma at one of the lgovernment hospitals. Our friends address him with the "doctor" title out of courtesy and jest.

I think the correct term for his status might be "para medic".

When they introduced him to me, I tried to be as encouraging and pleasant as possible because I feel that the mere desire to become a doctor who save lives is worth appreciating.

The boy also comes from a middle-class family of few menas. I might also add that he's Indian.

Maybe this route towards a medical degree was all he could get.

Mat Bruce
26-01-2010, 11:09 PM
The problem with this country is that we buy/sell like a pasar malam.. it all starts with a grand vision (2020?) and then it degrades itself due to lack of political will and eventually, it slumps into neglect.

The saving grace is that there are still a lot of sensible and intelligent people around but its continued ability politically to get away with a non meritocracy system will stress and frustrate the better talents.

We could be better but we are not, we could secure outstanding world performance but we are not...because we don't believe in rewarding the best...we practice croynism and uses threats to protect self interest

This attitude is very prevalent all around us..look at the way our roads are maintained..the enforcement of laws, our tendency to pay lips service, the lack of a sense of fair play..look at the way we drive in Jalan Tujuan!

The term 'potong jalan' reflects our Malaysian philosophy of everyday's life.

Potong queue to survive (look how many cars create a third queue and then potong in, you will see what I mean that this behaviour is slowly inculcated into us until it is part of 'Malaysia boleh' DNA' ), potong business partners out of a deal, potong jalan to get ahead in careers....I could go on...

The person who gets ahead is the person who potong jalan..

Take our blinders off, who is practicing croynism but talks alot and ten arrive at your conclusion who you should believe. Then for one precious election day, you get to make your statement.

Until the day that the Malaysian system change, I too will drive like a menace to get ahead because that is the name of the game.

Sentinel
27-01-2010, 12:26 AM
Mat Bruce, if you believe that Malaysia still has that one last chance to be saved, then I am really happy and I hope we will together ensure we don't waste this one last kopiak... lets get all our friends and family and colleagues all to be registered voters and make that one last chance possible! For the sake of our children and our children's children, lets do it together.

yvonnefoong
27-01-2010, 12:34 AM
The problem with this country is that we buy/sell like a pasar malam.. it all starts with a grand vision (2020?) and then it degrades itself due to lack of political will and eventually, it slumps into neglect.

The saving grace is that there are still a lot of sensible and intelligent people around but its continued ability politically to get away with a non meritocracy system will stress and frustrate the better talents.

We could be better but we are not, we could secure outstanding world performance but we are not...because we don't believe in rewarding the best...we practice croynism and uses threats to protect self interest

This attitude is very prevalent all around us..look at the way our roads are maintained..the enforcement of laws, our tendency to pay lips service, the lack of a sense of fair play..look at the way we drive in Jalan Tujuan!

The term 'potong jalan' reflects our Malaysian philosophy of everyday's life.

Potong queue to survive (look how many cars create a third queue and then potong in, you will see what I mean that this behaviour is slowly inculcated into us until it is part of 'Malaysia boleh' DNA' ), potong business partners out of a deal, potong jalan to get ahead in careers....I could go on...

The person who gets ahead is the person who potong jalan..

Take our blinders off, who is practicing croynism but talks alot and ten arrive at your conclusion who you should believe. Then for one precious election day, you get to make your statement.

Until the day that the Malaysian system change, I too will drive like a menace to get ahead because that is the name of the game.

I have to agree. It's in our culture. The culture we grew up with. We each could resolve to resist getting into the culture but it takes a lot of willpower and motivation.

It could be as simple as getting on the teacher's good books and hoping that will reward you with a scholarship because the teacher will put in a good word for you.

Sentinel
27-01-2010, 02:01 AM
I have to agree. It's in our culture. The culture we grew up with. We each could resolve to resist getting into the culture but it takes a lot of willpower and motivation.

It could be as simple as getting on the teacher's good books and hoping that will reward you with a scholarship because the teacher will put in a good word for you.
Please.... its NOT our culture at all to practise all these penyelewengans, this is a culture introduced in place of mediocrisy by the ruling party over a period of 52 years.

Ever since we were kids, we have alwyas been taught that the best man wins and we need to work hard to get what we want. Our parents NEVER once taught us about short cuts and cronyism so it is NOT our culture at all.

cskok8
27-01-2010, 02:00 PM
I typed this two days ago but deleted it by mistake. So here I am typing it again.

Few days ago, some friends visited. They brought along a friend. This boy completed two years of a Diploma in Medical Science at one of the local colleges. When the college upgraded itself to University College status, it could start offering degree level study, the MBBS. So now the boy has proceded to the third year of a traditionally five-year MBBS degree with a two year diploma qualification.

He is also fulfilling the practical requirement of his diploma at one of the lgovernment hospitals.
Maybe this route towards a medical degree was all he could get.

I have no idea which college / university college / university you are talking about. But generally medical schools/colleges do not accept any student other than into first year. The reason is that there are many systems of teaching medicine and different subjects are taught in the 1st, 2nd and subsequent years depending on the type of syllabus used. So what a student learns in the first 2 years in a particular college may not be the same as that taught in another one. Hopefully at the end of the 5 years all the students would have learnt enough to be safe doctors.

Rhiga
27-01-2010, 02:32 PM
I wonder if there is anything that can clearly distinguish University Colleges abroad and those in Malaysia. Say, a foreigner coming to Malaysia to study how can he recognize that University Colleges in this country IS NOT like the University Colleges in England?

Yvonne,

If I am a foreign student coming to Malaysia to study. First thing for sure is I wonder whether I was conned by the advertisement/agent wrt the definition of college or university in Malaysia.

Almost all of these “college” operate in shoplots. The ‘college’ here is an entirely different animal with the college elsewhere – no campus, no common corridor, no trees and not even an inch of grass, and don’t even think of decent library.

Some “better colleges” would have their own building, and normally high-rise. I emphasize it is building not campus. You hardly see grass or tree and always see students struggling and spending precious time looking for car park.

How about the university?? With the exception of Notthingham University at Semenyih, I won’t qualified others as university due to the pathetic small compound.

That’s why I advised my sister-in-law which have only limited budget, instead of spending 200k for a 3+0 degree course here, better send my nephew to UK even though the money can only last him less than 2 years.

bugbear
28-01-2010, 12:31 AM
Sigh, from what I gather here, it is a case of damn if you do and damn if you don't. Cheap and afordable colleges here are either a con job or not worth the money spend wherelse those of foreign origin are usually way way beyond the common wage earner. I am not surprise why parents still send their children to our local colleges knowing full well the dubious quality faculty staffs available there. The very least is for our MMC to tighten on the issuing of licences to all these fly by night establishments.

Otherwise, the quality of our future generation of MBBS/MD will be in question. :(

blues
28-01-2010, 08:04 AM
[QUOTE=cskok8]This University College / University status business is pure BS and only done in this country. In many countries there are Colleges and even Schools which award degrees that are ranked higher than any of our universities.QUOTE]


dont you realise that in USA,Australia + other countries,university/colleges also pure BS??

keen to know please, which schools that award degree higher than our local universities??

yvonnefoong
29-01-2010, 10:03 AM
I have no idea which college / university college / university you are talking about. But generally medical schools/colleges do not accept any student other than into first year. The reason is that there are many systems of teaching medicine and different subjects are taught in the 1st, 2nd and subsequent years depending on the type of syllabus used. So what a student learns in the first 2 years in a particular college may not be the same as that taught in another one. Hopefully at the end of the 5 years all the students would have learnt enough to be safe doctors.

It was a college offering diploma-level study and then upgraded itself to university college status so that their own students can proceed to it's degree courses with a diploma qualification obtained from the same institution. Haha now that I type it out, I find it sounding hilarious too!

cskok8
29-01-2010, 02:55 PM
I hope you are not talking about this college that is famous for turning out large numbers of nurses of dubious quality. ;)

drtwewe
31-01-2010, 08:02 PM
This is the problem of demand and supply.
The perents of university going kids are those who have successful career it 80's and 90's when Malaysian economy were booming. They are will to invest for their kids education and have financial ability to do so. That is why so many medical schools have been set up to meet the demand. I really doubt the quality of these medical school. I my opinion a medical school must have its own hospital or at least a hospital where its medical lecturers can actively practicing medicine.
Any medical school with no hospital or using a hospital where its lecturer do not practicing medicine is a below par medical school.
I am sad to see their hard earned $ spent on below par education.

yvonnefoong
31-01-2010, 11:30 PM
This is the problem of demand and supply.
The perents of university going kids are those who have successful career it 80's and 90's when Malaysian economy were booming. They are will to invest for their kids education and have financial ability to do so. That is why so many medical schools have been set up to meet the demand. I really doubt the quality of these medical school. I my opinion a medical school must have its own hospital or at least a hospital where its medical lecturers can actively practicing medicine.
Any medical school with no hospital or using a hospital where its lecturer do not practicing medicine is a below par medical school.
I am sad to see their hard earned $ spent on below par education.

Ah, lecturers should be practising medicine sounds very reasonable. Reminds me of my surgeons at HEI who are teaching at USC's Keck School of Medicine and some have honorary degrees.

It also reminds me that as a student and patient, i would look up on a doctor's scholartic publications. When I was contemplating Proton Therapy to treat my Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma last year, I have to read the publications of doctors dealing with Proton Therapy because information to Proton therapy has not been made easily accessible and it's treatment is not commercially available too.

Medicine and education is closely related.

This leads me to think that a good doctor will not hesitate to explain to his patient intelligently and maturely when he asks about his illness and course of treatment even if it's time consuming, because the doctor should be a learner and educator by heart.

It's wonderful and inspiring to be cared for by a doctor who is also a teacher. In my study of Psychology, I would cite my Neurosurgeon's written works in my papers too.