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ungkb
02-01-2010, 09:32 PM
Annular Solar Eclipse (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2010-Fig01.pdf)



Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur
Begin - 07:01
Max - 08:26
End - 09:38


Permission is freely granted to reproduce this data when accompanied by an acknowledgment:

"Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC"

mick123
02-01-2010, 09:49 PM
tx kb for the heads up.....will try to shoot my first ever solar eclipse.....

lady-o-leisure
03-01-2010, 01:04 AM
Wow! Thanks Ung, for the info. Seems my sis will be in Goa at the time and she will hv the best view around.
Mick.... is there any particular advice u would give to anyone attempting to take a solar eclipse pic?

mick123
03-01-2010, 08:06 AM
hi L-OL, hmmm.....that's a good question......also gonna be my first attempt.... have to do more research but i always see people putting some dark filters on the lens. so i guess will be putting on my sunglasses (for myself) and putting on the CPL and ND filters for my lens....

maybe Finetuned has better advice.

FineTuned
03-01-2010, 10:01 AM
A solar eclipse is probably one of the most awesome astronomical sights......and should not be missed as a photographic event. In Malaysia, we will only be able to view a partial eclipse, and not the annular one. Here, the moon will only cover about a third of the sun. Which makes it all the more dangerous.

I cannot stress enough that to view any solar event safely, do not use homemade filters unless you fully understand the performance of your `filter'. It's the health of your only pair of eyes at stake. Remember that the Sun emits a lot of energy which is not within the visible bandwidth of human vision, and these are very deadly to your cornea and retina.

To photograph the Sun, you generally only need a ND no.5 filter (cuts out about 1/1,000 of 1% of light received. We can temporarily get by without a filter at the point of maximum eclipse during a total eclipse (since the sun is completely blocked by the moon) but for all other types of solar eclipses, use at least a proper ND filter.

Solar filters are not simply darkened film or standard ND filters. Solar filters will not only cut the amount of light transmitted, they also reflect away most of the unwanted energy, seen or unseen. For more dramatic effects, try a hydrogen alpha filter....you will see prominences (the `flames' shooting out from the sun) and really frightening details of our closest furious star!

If one is keen enough, invest in a proper solar filter. These will cost you around RM300 (or less) for a ~72mm filter size. You can use the filter to shoot future eclipses, sunspots and planet transits the rest of your life.

Use a manual camera as far as is possible. Or go into manual mode, for both exposure and focus. Events during a solar eclipse take place in slow motion...you will have plenty of time to bracket exposures. Manual focusing is no issue, since you are shooting at infinity throughout. Whereas auto focusing on the darkened Sun with an ND filter on can (in my experience) cause the camera AI to hunt haplessly.

Otherwise, all cameras and standard accessories are perfectly usable for an eclipse event. Don't forget to shoot the expressions of people watching the eclipse. This is sometimes more entertaining than the eclipse itself!

Sorry for being so long winded.

FineTuned
03-01-2010, 01:34 PM
Please note the local times for the partial eclipse for USJ:

Friday, 15th January 2009,
First contact: 3.02:32 pm
Last Contact: 5.38:29 pm

give or take half a minute due to my poor math. :D

We won't have a proper peak as it will only be a partial eclipse...but the best viewing time should be around 4.15 - 4.45 pm.

The times given by ungkb in the starting post are UTC/GMT before correction for viewing in USJ area.

tmd
03-01-2010, 03:09 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/80/SE2010Jan15A.gif

mick123
03-01-2010, 06:13 PM
To photograph the Sun, you generally only need a ND no.5 filter (cuts out about 1/1,000 of 1% of light received.

If one is keen enough, invest in a proper solar filter. These will cost you around RM300 (or less) for a ~72mm filter size. You can use the filter to shoot future eclipses, sunspots and planet transits the rest of your life.



tx FT for the detailed explaination. will stack my ND and CPL filters and hope for the best that it will not fry my cam's sensor. will need to think really hard for the solar filter for a 77mm....

FineTuned
03-01-2010, 07:35 PM
mick, if your sensor gets fried, it's the perfect excuse for a new camera! :D

Seriously, why don't you try a shoot of the Sun tomorrow with all the available filters stacked on and the polarizers crossed? There are some rare sunspots right now and it will be a good test. If you can resolve the tiny sunspots....then it shows the filter combo hasn't cost you too much of a loss in contrast and sharpness.

mick123
03-01-2010, 10:32 PM
not sure if i can get those sunspots as i onli got 200mm :( but will give it try tomorrow evening

ya it will be a great excuse for a new cam from canon too if it gets fried :D

mick123
14-01-2010, 09:46 AM
let's hope it doesn't rain tomorrow afternoon.

Tong
14-01-2010, 10:22 AM
One way to view is to get a sheet of card or wood and drill a hole in it then hold it up to the sun and let the light through the hole onto another flat surface .. as the eclipse proceeds you will see the shape of the projected light change. No danger of blinding yourself this way.

hope it's not cloudy ... enjoy!

nyem
14-01-2010, 09:56 PM
http://www.heywhatsthat.com/201001-solar-eclipse.html has a simulation of the eclipse, can view how much of the eclipse we'll get to see.

Met Dept forecasts thunderstorms (http://www.met.gov.my/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=685&Itemid=905) tomorrow

FineTuned
15-01-2010, 12:30 AM
I was surprised to see a couple of tiny sunspots on Tuesday....and latest reports indicate they're growing....one is now the size of 10 Earths! This is a real bonus for eclipse watchers this afternoon. The Sun has been (relatively speaking) very quiet the past few years and it seems to be finally getting out of a unusually long solar minimum phase.

Good news for sun watchers, bad news for telecommunications. :D

Jeyanthy
15-01-2010, 08:48 AM
Annular Solar Eclipse (http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2010-Fig01.pdf)



Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur
Begin - 07:01
Max - 08:26
End - 09:38


Permission is freely granted to reproduce this data when accompanied by an acknowledgment:

"Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC"

I think you got your timing wrong.
It should be: UTC (Time)

(P1) Partial begin 4:05:28 --->12:05:28 (Malaysian Time)
(U1) Total begin 5:13:55 --->13:13:55 (Malaysian Time)
Greatest eclipse 7:07:39 --->15:07:39 (Malaysian Time)
(U4) Total end 8:59:04 --->16:59:04 (Malaysian Time)
(P4) Partial end 10:07:35 ---> 18:07:35 (Malaysian Time)

Please check this site:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_January_15,_2010
http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2010/1/7/nation/20100107201440&sec=nation
http://www.straitstimes.com/BreakingNews/Singapore/Story/STIStory_477423.html

FineTuned
15-01-2010, 10:27 AM
Jeyanthy, we do not see the annular eclipse in Malaysia, and there is no total eclipse anywhere in the world today. You cannot simply translate the time for the places which can see the full annular eclipse, because they will see the eclipse for a longer period from first contact to the last contact.

I took a look at the Sun just an hour ago, and the sunspots are becoming more obvious. Tiny though they seem to be in the pic, you can fit many Earths inside one of them!

A snap through my digicam reveal this:-
http://img42.imageshack.us/img42/6791/sun20100115.jpg

AllUrban
15-01-2010, 03:24 PM
how about the eclipse, anyone seeing anything?

They made an announcement about special prayers at the masjid today.

Cheers, m

FineTuned
15-01-2010, 06:32 PM
I started watching at about 2.55pm....nothing but clouds everywhere. Suddenly a small parting in the clouds and the sun shone through! I got to see the beginning of the eclipse at 3.02-3.03pm. Then the clouds came rolling back in to stay. :D

Jeyanthy
15-01-2010, 10:19 PM
Jeyanthy, we do not see the annular eclipse in Malaysia, and there is no total eclipse anywhere in the world today. You cannot simply translate the time for the places which can see the full annular eclipse, because they will see the eclipse for a longer period from first contact to the last contact.


Sorry, the info I sent was basically for the Hindus who observe certain "pantangs" from the time the penumbra takes place till it ends. It doesn't matter when this actually takes place in Malaysia but we need to observe certain "pantangs" from the time the atmosphere is affected. :D

mick123
15-01-2010, 10:46 PM
no luck this time.....clouds all the way :(

FineTuned
16-01-2010, 07:34 AM
Sorry, the info I sent was basically for the Hindus who observe certain "pantangs" from the time the penumbra takes place till it ends. It doesn't matter when this actually takes place in Malaysia but we need to observe certain "pantangs" from the time the atmosphere is affected. :D
Thanks for the clarification. Is this related to the Maha Kumbh Mela? I'm really blur when it comes to other peoples' religious practices. I remember during last year's total eclipse the Hindus had another ritual at the Ganges too, but I can't for the life of me recollect what it's called.

Jeyanthy
17-01-2010, 08:01 AM
Thanks for the clarification. Is this related to the Maha Kumbh Mela? I'm really blur when it comes to other peoples' religious practices. I remember during last year's total eclipse the Hindus had another ritual at the Ganges too, but I can't for the life of me recollect what it's called.

It's called Makara Sankranti. The day of eclipse coincides with the exact day the Sun returns to Northern hemisphere. Some people celebrate "Ponggal" on this day by making sweet milk brown rice on this day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sankranthi
http://www.salagram.net/parishad110.htm