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LMei
27-05-2009, 01:58 PM
Hubby came back from Amsterdam and noticed that the light switches there are located at 4 feet from the ground. Easy for a child/disabled person to reach. We wanted to implement that in our house so that it's easy for our son to switch on/off the lights (good to train when young). However, our contractor says that it's illegal in Malaysia to do that. Can anyone confirm this?

jimmyay
27-05-2009, 04:42 PM
It makes sense when it is 4 feet from the ground.

Illegal in Msia? Hmmm...maybe some expert can explain. Is it worry about water splashing to the switches?

LMei
27-05-2009, 05:22 PM
It makes sense when it is 4 feet from the ground.

Illegal in Msia? Hmmm...maybe some expert can explain. Is it worry about water splashing to the switches?
My contractor claim he could lose his licence. It has follow the standard height set.

Water splashing? :confused: How is that possible in the house other than wet hands...

USJ27Resident
27-05-2009, 05:39 PM
Best you check with Persatuan Arkitek Malaysia (PAM) for the by-laws on switches... they're located @ Jln Tangsi, KL. Used to have their number but not anymore.

What I know is electrical wires are supposed to be installed horizontally or vertically on walls but never diagonally... although I've seen some electricians/contractors 'short cut' this ruling to save on wires... DUNNO about minimum height of switches though... if it is assumed electrical lighting switches are supposed to be 4 feet high
~ why then are the 13A electrical plug points at ground level... wouldn't that be even more dangerous ( for water splashes or curious toddlers) :confused:
~ bedside electrical switches in hotels... those ones are like 2.5 feet high, next to the bed... :confused:

AllUrban
27-05-2009, 07:17 PM
Best you check with Persatuan Arkitek Malaysia (PAM) for the by-laws on switches... they're located @ Jln Tangsi, KL. Used to have their number but not anymore.

What I know is electrical wires are supposed to be installed horizontally or vertically on walls but never diagonally... although I've seen some electricians/contractors 'short cut' this ruling to save on wires... DUNNO about minimum height of switches though... if it is assumed electrical lighting switches are supposed to be 4 feet high
~ why then are the 13A electrical plug points at ground level... wouldn't that be even more dangerous ( for water splashes or curious toddlers) :confused:
~ bedside electrical switches in hotels... those ones are like 2.5 feet high, next to the bed... :confused:I have a few OKU friends who have probably looked at modifying their homes to make them OKU friendly - lowered light switches are definitely one of those modifications.

I will see what I can find out from them.

Cheers, m

patrick
27-05-2009, 08:29 PM
My contractor claim he could lose his licence. It has follow the standard height set.

Water splashing? :confused: How is that possible in the house other than wet hands...

Personally, even if you do change the height of the switches, who is to know? In this country, no one checks your electrical "renovation"! Just quietly do it...that's my advice. Adjusting the height of the switch is such a minor adjustment. Who's the wiser?

Just change your electrician.

tupai
27-05-2009, 08:46 PM
if there was such a rule determining the precise height of a switch...then all the architects and the housing authorities abiding by such archaic law are idiots!

Theer are godzillion homes, offices, complexes with modern tech like with a mere clap of hands, can switch on and off any thing, from lights to aircons...so whats the big deal with the height?

*clap*clap*clap* ~ lights off! Oops! alamak! mistake! just turned off the aquarium pump! :o

*clap*clap* ~ lights off!


Yang Blinded by the lights latotupai

Firebird
27-05-2009, 08:49 PM
Personally, even if you do change the height of the switches, who is to know? In this country, no one checks your electrical "renovation"!You're da*n right. They are too busy working with Interpol to track down bloggers to bother with your "electrical renovation" or any little illegal stuff you do in your home. :p

Carolrasiah
28-05-2009, 12:43 AM
Hubby came back from Amsterdam and noticed that the light switches there are located at 4 feet from the ground. Easy for a child/disabled person to reach. We wanted to implement that in our house so that it's easy for our son to switch on/off the lights (good to train when young). However, our contractor says that it's illegal in Malaysia to do that. Can anyone confirm this?
I changed it at my place :)

LMei
28-05-2009, 03:38 PM
I called the PAM and was asked to call the Board of Architects (LAM) instead. Spoke to a nice lady and she offered to check the UBBL (Uniform Building By Law) and call me back.

I was pleasantly surprised when she did call me back within 3 hours to tell me that it is the norm to install switches at 5 feet height but not a must. Therefore I can change it to a lower height. Thank you all for your feedback. This was an urgent thing as the wiring is currently being installed today this very minute!

tsela
28-05-2009, 04:07 PM
Switches mounted at lower height of 4 feet (some, 3 feet) from the ground in many foreign countries is primarily a disabled-friendly approach, propelled by the implementation of discrimination acts. Measures were brought in one to two decade ago to prevent discrimination against disability community in Australia, New Zealand, UK and US.

Discrimination act recognizes and protects the civil rights of people with disabilities. It places employers and service providers the obligations to have their premises accessible to the physically challenged for goods and services, and they would be prosecuted for non-compliance.

Other than light switches, many facilities such as telephones, automated teller machines (ATM), water coolers were addressed as well.

We noticed power outlets/sockets in the living or bedrooms are generally lower and near floor level. I don’t have information as to why they are closer to the floor but reckoned that it is to hide them from our line of sight, for cosmetic purpose.

Nevertheless, the risk of electric shock from wall power outlets could be dramatically reduced, merely by changing to sockets that incorporated shutters in their designs. The shutters cover insertion slots and only slide open when the correct pin from three-pin plugs are inserted into sockets. They are easily available at local electrical, hardware and DIY stores. I preferred the ones that come with neon indicator light when power is switched on.

Without altering the height of the switches, one can use remote control for lighting. Eventually, you will have assortment of remote controls for TV, video player, radio/Hi-Fi stereo system, ceiling fans, air-conditioners, electric curtains, alarm system, automatic gate … what will they think of next?

Wondered if the disability discrimination act is in well place and enforced in Malaysia. Just last month, a staunch politician fell from his wheel chair at a court complex. Seldom would you see in Malaysia soil concrete pavements that are comfortably built for wheel chairs. Wheel chairs and baby strollers cruise on bitumen road like any other vehicles. :(



My contractor claim he could lose his licence.

Just change your electrician. Some say change your government.


References and further reading:

Disability Act
United Kingdom - Disability discrimination act 1995
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disability_Discrimination_Act_1995
America - Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americans_with_Disabilities_Act

Building Codes and Standard
United Kingdom - BS (British Standard) 8300 from British Standards Institution
http://www.bsi-global.com/Shop/Publication-Detail/?pid=000000000030153846
America – ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Standard for Accessible Design
http://www.ada.gov/stdspdf.htm
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-Appendix-52467
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a/fig5.htm
America - ICC (International Code Council)/ANSI(American National Standards Institute) A117.1-2003 Standard on Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities
http://www.iccsafe.org/e/prodshow.html?prodid=9033S03

Carolrasiah
28-05-2009, 11:59 PM
Switches mounted at lower height of 4 feet (some, 3 feet) from the ground in many foreign countries is primarily a disabled-friendly approach, propelled by the implementation of discrimination acts. Measures were brought in one to two decade ago to prevent discrimination against disability community in Australia, New Zealand, UK and US.

Discrimination act recognizes and protects the civil rights of people with disabilities. It places employers and service providers the obligations to have their premises accessible to the physically challenged for goods and services, and they would be prosecuted for non-compliance.

Other than light switches, many facilities such as telephones, automated teller machines (ATM), water coolers were addressed as well.

We noticed power outlets/sockets in the living or bedrooms are generally lower and near floor level. I don’t have information as to why they are closer to the floor but reckoned that it is to hide them from our line of sight, for cosmetic purpose.

Nevertheless, the risk of electric shock from wall power outlets could be dramatically reduced, merely by changing to sockets that incorporated shutters in their designs. The shutters cover insertion slots and only slide open when the correct pin from three-pin plugs are inserted into sockets. They are easily available at local electrical, hardware and DIY stores. I preferred the ones that come with neon indicator light when power is switched on.

Without altering the height of the switches, one can use remote control for lighting. Eventually, you will have assortment of remote controls for TV, video player, radio/Hi-Fi stereo system, ceiling fans, air-conditioners, electric curtains, alarm system, automatic gate … what will they think of next?

Wondered if the disability discrimination act is in well place and enforced in Malaysia. Just last month, a staunch politician fell from his wheel chair at a court complex. Seldom would you see in Malaysia soil concrete pavements that are comfortably built for wheel chairs. Wheel chairs and baby strollers cruise on bitumen road like any other vehicles. :(

Some say change your government.


References and further reading:

Disability Act
United Kingdom - Disability discrimination act 1995
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disability_Discrimination_Act_1995
America - Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americans_with_Disabilities_Act

Building Codes and Standard
United Kingdom - BS (British Standard) 8300 from British Standards Institution
http://www.bsi-global.com/Shop/Publication-Detail/?pid=000000000030153846
America – ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Standard for Accessible Design
http://www.ada.gov/stdspdf.htm
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-Appendix-52467
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a/fig5.htm
America - ICC (International Code Council)/ANSI(American National Standards Institute) A117.1-2003 Standard on Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities
http://www.iccsafe.org/e/prodshow.html?prodid=9033S03
it is a long long........................long road for us in wheelchairsDiscrimination act recognizes and protects the civil rights of people with disabilities - the goverment has a problem understand these ACTS

AllUrban
29-05-2009, 08:35 AM
it is a long long........................long road for us in wheelchairsDiscrimination act recognizes and protects the civil rights of people with disabilities - the goverment has a problem understand these ACTSThe government has accepted international standards and is in the process of ratifying the act.

It should be a priority but sadly, it is not thanks to other "so-called" priorities. People in government say it would "cost too much money" and then proceed to waste money in other areas....

So the only real solution is to do both - change your electrician (and raise awareness) and change the government (or at least, change their way of thinking).

Sigh....Even the new RapidKL disabled-friendly buses turned out to be unfriendly - the RapidPenang buses are generally better but not as friendly as people had hoped.

Cheers, m

LMei
30-05-2009, 04:07 PM
Looks like I am still too late. Everything was done at 5 feet height. :(

Carolrasiah
30-05-2009, 10:59 PM
The government has accepted international standards and is in the process of ratifying the act.

It should be a priority but sadly, it is not thanks to other "so-called" priorities. People in government say it would "cost too much money" and then proceed to waste money in other areas....

So the only real solution is to do both - change your electrician (and raise awareness) and change the government (or at least, change their way of thinking).

Sigh....Even the new RapidKL disabled-friendly buses turned out to be unfriendly - the RapidPenang buses are generally better but not as friendly as people had hoped.

Cheers, m
i would go for changing the goverment.