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MOYSC
17-05-2007, 04:37 PM
Appreciate if anyone can give me some insights on private schooling for primary level kids.

Noticed the obvious declining standards of the national schools - lack of 'out-of-the class' exposures, lack of proper guidance- including cultivating good habits & manners, lack of follow-ups (ie. school work/ homework unchecked/unmarked for several weeks), lack of 'compulsory' workbook usage, lack of teachers, teachers absence during class periods increasing (especially during moral lessons), lack emphasis on non-academic subjects (ie. art, PE, Moral, KT, etc.)....just to name a few.

Very, very disturbing & frustrating...

coleslaw
17-05-2007, 04:54 PM
check out sri kdu in kota damansara...

evelynlim
17-05-2007, 05:49 PM
Another one is Beaconhouse (sorry spelling may not be correct) ! Their preschool is at SS 19,SJ, you can see it from the main road & I think the primary school is in PJ. You may check out their website for more informations. You may check out Sekolah Sri Sedaya at SS13 & Methodist school at KL. If I can afford I will send my child to private school as well :rolleyes:

MOYSC
17-05-2007, 07:14 PM
Another one is Beaconhouse (sorry spelling may not be correct) ! Their preschool is at SS 19,SJ, you can see it from the main road & I think the primary school is in PJ. You may check out their website for more informations. You may check out Sekolah Sri Sedaya at SS13 & Methodist school at KL. If I can afford I will send my child to private school as well :rolleyes:


Tq for all the feedbacks. Heard fo this Methodist school in KL (Private, I think) which I received good feedbacks. However, its for secondary levels. Unfortunately, my kids are still either in pre-school or primary levels only.

Yeap! did check out Sri Sedaya & Sri KDU. But still scouting around before we finalise our decision.

BTW, curious to know what had happened to all those missionary schools out there??? Used to be really good schools - don't even hv to think about private schools & very affordable too! Anyone has any info on this? LA Salle, Victoria Institution, etc??? :confused:

ahtal68
17-05-2007, 08:49 PM
Try this link. This group provides education right up to degree level and is located at

No 1, Persiaran A,
Off Jalan Lapangan Terbang Subang,
47200 Subang, Selangor.


http://smartschool.apiit.edu.my/

sinleong
17-05-2007, 09:01 PM
send your kid to a chinese school

tesdniMa
17-05-2007, 10:52 PM
Some of the private schools charge very high fees...makes you wonder whether the teachers are from another planet.. because whatever facilities are offered it ultimately comes down to the quality of the teachers and the management.

I've only heard good comments about Sri Nobel in Kelana Jaya.. SS6..near the SK Kelana Jaya school. ..small class size and dedicated teachers..

Also check out the Sri Inai in Taman Sea.. good reviews since Beaconhouse (I think they are Pakistani based with strong UK ties.. not sure) took over the management.. like an "international" school with local syllabus.. they might offer O and A levels in the near future I suppose..
http://www.beaconhouse.edu.my/


Sri Cahaya .. somewhere in Bkt Jelutong.. also good reviews.

MOYSC
17-05-2007, 10:56 PM
send your kid to a chinese school

TQVM. No doubt that chinese schools are better but unfortunately, none of us in the family knows how to communicate in mandarin- the major obstacle! Children wld suffer if parents can't even provide the minimum guide.

Besides, chinese schools emphasize too much on academic work. We prefer an all rounder approach like the ones in international schools and/or the American way of teaching. However, international schools are just too costly & their entrance quota can be very stringent especially for the famous ones.

layman
17-05-2007, 11:09 PM
any private chinese school in Kl with smaller classes?

MOYSC
17-05-2007, 11:20 PM
any private chinese school in Kl with smaller classes?

Try this :
http://www.chonghwakl.edu.my/. Heard fr a friend that this is a very good school.

Dunno whether got smaller classes, but in general, many private schools promises no more than 30 students per class (some only max. 24) :)

jasonbhlee
17-05-2007, 11:36 PM
Tq for all the feedbacks. Heard fo this Methodist school in KL (Private, I think) which I received good feedbacks. However, its for secondary levels. Unfortunately, my kids are still either in pre-school or primary levels only.

Yeap! did check out Sri Sedaya & Sri KDU. But still scouting around before we finalise our decision.


You can never find a perfect school. A school which may be 'good' to one student, does not mean that it will be good for your child and vice versa. Teachers in private schools are not better than those in national schools. However private schools do satisfy your requirerment for holistic education. Your kids will have better exposure to extra curricular activities, computer lessons, chinese language classes (compulsory for primary kids) and most of all, I like the opportunity your kids will have especially in representing his/her school/house in sporting or educational events. Only 20 students to a class.
One observation is that if you are a exam oriented parent, do not send your kids to a private school. Results are not as good as those from national schools. Students tend to take it much easier in private schools. Its the same everywhere you go.

evelynlim
18-05-2007, 12:54 PM
Besides, chinese schools emphasize too much on academic work. We prefer an all rounder approach like the ones in international schools and/or the American way of teaching. However, international schools are just too costly & their entrance quota can be very stringent especially for the famous ones.

Pray hard that the UPSR exam will be abolished :) Then it will be less academic & less pressure in the chinese school. :)

amy_melanie
18-05-2007, 03:22 PM
Victoria Institution is quite good. Lately been declared a cluster school. Track record also not bad. But dunno how easy it is to get in...

MOYSC
18-05-2007, 04:16 PM
Victoria Institution is quite good. Lately been declared a cluster school. Track record also not bad. But dunno how easy it is to get in...

Yeap! can bet VI is a good one. However, dunno about nowadays tho'. My dad used to be fr there & its a well-known school-strict, emphasize discipline & produce overall outstanding results. However, if I'm not mistaken, it only caters for secondary levels. Used to be tough getting in but now- absolutely no idea!

Hope to find a 'balance' school for my kids - moderately good in academics & hv lots of non-academic activities. I noticed primary children need to play to learn - especially the more adventurous ones-the boys. Girls tend to be more disciplined & well-mannered fr young & hence easier to adapt to 'classroom-focused' schools.

ryzall2006
19-05-2007, 10:01 AM
Appreciate if anyone can give me some insights on private schooling for primary level kids.

Noticed the obvious declining standards of the national schools - lack of 'out-of-the class' exposures, lack of proper guidance- including cultivating good habits & manners, lack of follow-ups (ie. school work/ homework unchecked/unmarked for several weeks), lack of 'compulsory' workbook usage, lack of teachers, teachers absence during class periods increasing (especially during moral lessons), lack emphasis on non-academic subjects (ie. art, PE, Moral, KT, etc.)....just to name a few.

Very, very disturbing & frustrating...
u r really sober in this matter.really scaring and troubled right? me too that's why my children are in private--not because we are filthy rich but because of all the problems that u mentioned.(it is absolutely true--the real world of our education system here).
you can check this web --very informative---SchoolMalaysia.com:Malaysian school Guide online.l think sri Kl at subang jaya is good--they have pre-school

Rocky19
19-05-2007, 12:07 PM
you can check out Sekolah Sri Cahaya.They run by the same group as CEC,Education ventures. Fees are reasonable, quite a distance from SJ but there are school buses.

monster
19-05-2007, 04:19 PM
Victoria Institution is quite good. Lately been declared a cluster school. Track record also not bad. But dunno how easy it is to get in...

as an VI old boy, the "general requirement" is priority given to students with 5A, then 4A 1B. Also other things taken into consideration is other activities of the student like class monitor, prefect, sports etc.
Priority for hostel is given to outstation students.

Its a boys school except Form 6 is mixed. Students are very strongly encouraged to take up 1 uniform group (Band, Infantry, Red Crescent or Scouts), 1 sports activity and 1 club/interest group activity. Also there's a swimming pool and swimming lessons are part of the time table for Form 1-3.

The VI Old Boys Association and Foundation are very active and support the school in money and kind. They run many social events and fund rising for the school. They have their own clubhouse at the school. The headmaster's house and teachers' quarters are on site too.

kwchang
20-05-2007, 12:37 AM
Least people get confused, VI (Victoria Institution) is NOT a private school.
Isn't this thread about private schools?

irisbaggins
20-05-2007, 01:02 AM
I personally think any schools are the same. If you send your child to the best school and yet shows no interest (i mean REAL interest as in not those only hoping for good grades)...in his education, the school is going to be as bad as those you think are terrible.

I've been into education line for almost 15 years now...and I believe education is not only bout syllabus but also extra curriculum. I always tell parents to allow their children to join clubs, sports instead of tuition classes to learn, to get educated. Education is not only good grades but also other qualities like leadership, friendship, interaction, thinking skills, problem solving and etc.

So dont bother bout the school being private or not....

(just my 2 cents worth)

USJ27Resident
20-05-2007, 01:29 AM
I personally think any schools are the same. If you send your child to the best school and yet shows no interest (i mean REAL interest as in not those only hoping for good grades)...in his education, the school is going to be as bad as those you think are terrible.

(just my 2 cents worth)

Wise words from a wise person... 15 years in the industry !!! Can only imagine the number of Panadols consumed of that period of time... :p due to student induced headaches and migraines... :D It is true what you said above though...

But it works both ways too... whilst a kid needs to be taught that studies are an important/integral part of growing up... the teachers needs to be equally responsible for ensuring that the students get the quality teachings and equal attention in their subjects.

Now please don't say how does a teacher get to do that in a public school with 40+ kids in a class.. I have seen it being done before - how/why? simply because most of the teachers (then!) had the dedication and drive to teach, and to see their wards grow up and excel in their studies and life...

Nowadays... mostly half past six teachers in public schools (AND MAYBE IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS TOO!) that rely on "instant" reference books and revision books from hypermarkets and bookstores to get their work done for the kids... :rolleyes: That too, I have personally seen happen...

Sending the kid to a private school and not knowing that he/she would mix with the wrong group of students can also bring reprecussions too... Imagine being left out just because the "rich brats" think the kid cannot afford to join them... 1001 other reasons/situations as well....

orchipalar
20-05-2007, 01:37 AM
Err buddies...can someone be kind to refresh Orchi's failing memory...?

Those days...how were we taught in private or otherwise public schools...?

Why is it not good enough...?

n why suddenly...Orchi hears...there are plans to scrap academic tests n exams in schools altogether...?

USJ27Resident
20-05-2007, 02:16 AM
n why suddenly...Orchi hears...there are plans to scrap academic tests n exams in schools altogether...?

Because the teachers are running out of ideas on how to test the students, perhaps??? :p

monster
20-05-2007, 01:10 PM
Least people get confused, VI (Victoria Institution) is NOT a private school.
Isn't this thread about private schools?

oopsss!! Thousand appologies Mastergy, got carried away.... talking abt old school... even after 20 odd years leaving school, many fond memories :p :)

birdy
20-05-2007, 01:35 PM
TQVM. No doubt that chinese schools are better but unfortunately, none of us in the family knows how to communicate in mandarin- the major obstacle! Children wld suffer if parents can't even provide the minimum guide.
I don't agree that your children will suffer just b'coz the parents can't speak. If you are initiative enough, you can learn together with your children and this would create more fun in learning.... Mandarin will eventually become one of the business language in the future especially we can see the China is catching up USA in terms of development.

I think it is getting more and more common to see non-chinese children being sent to Chinese schools nowadays and I don't think their parents would think like you. ... worst..the children will speak your dialect at home and speak mandarin in school.

rotarymum
20-05-2007, 04:39 PM
1) The Alice Smith School in KL follows the Brit Curriculum. They've been around for about 60 yrs, i think.. For kids of ages 3-11 the Primary School is in Jalan Bellamy and the Secondary School in Equine Park, Near Puncak Jalil is for kids of ages 11-18yrs. Add:No. 2 Jln Bellamy 50460 Kuala Lumpur Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur Kuala Lumpur 50460 Malaysia
Tel : 032148-3674
Add:No.3 Jalan Equine, Taman Equine 43300 Seri Kembangan. Tel:95433588 Fax:95433788
Application Fee:RM400, Parent's Memebership (compulsory):RM20, Enrolment fee:16,000 , 8,000 as deposit which will be returned once child leaves school, and tuition fees.

2) Garden Int'l KL 16, Jalan Kiara 3
Off Jalan Bukit Kiara
50480 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia Tel: +603-62096888 Email:admissions@gardenschool.edu.my
Admission fee:RM500, registration fee:10,000, tuition fee: between 6500-10000 depending on the child's age and type of tuition.

elc international school. Class size is about 18. The only drawback is the requirement(s) which elc has set:- one parent is a foreign national, or
the child has been attending school outside of Malaysia for not less than 3 years. (this excludes Pre-school & Kindergarten). The primary and secondary curriculum is prescribed by Edexcel International - London Examinations (IGCSE/GCSE/GCE). Admission is 4000, regist: 200, deposit: 1 term fee which ranges from 2715(early years) - 6610 (year 11) and other costs like books, uniform etc.

Sekolah Sri Cempaka in Setiabakti 1, Bukit Damansara

Sekolah Tinggi Methodist :Off Jalan Lee Sam Seremban Negeri Sembilan 70000 Malaysia Seremban Negeri Sembilan 70000 Malaysia

MOYSC
21-05-2007, 05:36 PM
I've been into education line for almost 15 years now...and I believe education is not only bout syllabus but also extra curriculum. I always tell parents to allow their children to join clubs, sports instead of tuition classes to learn, to get educated. Education is not only good grades but also other qualities like leadership, friendship, interaction, thinking skills, problem solving and etc.

So dont bother bout the school being private or not....

(just my 2 cents worth)

Tq for the insights. I fully agree that there must be a balance between academic & non-acedamic (extra curricular activities). For the latter, this is where I believe some/most of the govt schools hv failed. My older son did not even get a chance to participate in any activities (ie. field trips, sports day events, etc) fr Std 1 to 3. He wasn't even allowed to take part in any school activities until he's in Std 4.

On the contrary, both my kids were already exposed to many kinds of outdoor activities during pre-school days, ie. lots of fun-filled activities, experiments, field work & field trips. I can't understand why the schools hv to stop all these activities when children needs to play to learn.

As parents, we try to expose them to outdoor activities as much as possible, but there are places & things which only the schools can do. That's when parents are handicapped.

Why are our children only restricted to classroom learning during their early primary years??? I've wrote to the schools & Jab Pendidikan on this matter before & their reply was that young children are NOT easy to handle.

As for the syllabus, both private & govt schools share the same KBSR/KBSM syllabus, except that private schools wld include the Singapore or British syllabus for certain subjects.

Frankly, our M'sian syllabus 'sucks'! Lack continuity & lack information. Based on the primary syllabus, the children seems to be learning everything on the surface only (lack knowledge expansion) and lack subject/topic integration. Textbook info are too generalised & brief!

If I could, I wld certainly prefer schools that cater for Singapore, Aussie, American or British syllabus. However, how many schools here in M'sia do offer such syllabus??? If there were, either the school fees are exhorbitantly high or there is a restricted enrolment quota for M'sians.

Just enquired Sayfol International school & they told me that even tho' the Edu Ministry now allows M'sians into Int schools, the ministry sometimes imposes extra 'conditions' that neither the school or the parents hv knowledge on. Sigh...

MOYSC
21-05-2007, 06:09 PM
Nowadays... mostly half past six teachers in public schools (AND MAYBE IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS TOO!) that rely on "instant" reference books and revision books from hypermarkets and bookstores to get their work done for the kids... :rolleyes: That too, I have personally seen happen...



"Half Past Six" is the precise term for many govt teachers nowadays. Even my son's school acknowledges this fact & the school's admin is finding difficulty handling this type of teachers.

Not only the teachers do not hv the right aptitude to teach, they are not qualified in the field of education- no 3-yr Diploma in Education. Most probably its due to the high percentage of jobless grads lah!

Worst of all, such non-performing teachers cannot be sacked. They can either be moved around or the school wld hv to make the best use of them. Sound scarry???

Well, I don't know what's the scenario in private schools. However, I hope someone in here can share their experience(s) on teaching standards/quality in private institutions.

Tq. :)

tesdniMa
21-05-2007, 07:01 PM
Have you yourself paid a visit to some of the schools suggested here? or are you only looking at subang/usj area? I have friends with kids in Sri Inai and Sri Nobel and they are "fussy" parents who have searched far and wide before deciding.

Also as someone as suggested , no school will be perfect.. as long as parents are very much involved in their children's lives they will turn out alright.

This NST readers' letter suggests that not all private schools are as great as they market themselves.
http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/NST/Monday/Letters/20070521083141/Article/index_html

Its no surprise why some parents have turned to homeschooling. They then realise that they were pushed into a situation where the kids actually benefit the most . :-)

Like you are trying through this forum its best to get first hand info from parents..

geordie
21-05-2007, 07:50 PM
Been following this thread with great interest.

Our son spent almost a year in one of the so-called top private schools in the city (which boasts of the grandkids of the PM among its students) . As parents, we would have given the Malaysian education system every bit of a chance. O.k., private schools may offer many more extra curricular activities, super clean cafetarias with different menu for every day of the month etc, good size swimming pool and tennis courts which the SJKs can only look on in envy .... but the crux of the education system is ... its teachers.

Sadly, the current generation of teachers (even those in private schools)were brought up in an atmosphere where they weren't encourage to ask any question, to seek further intellectual enlightenment beyond the text books and hence, they do not take lightly to their students now who have enquiring minds. How do we produce a creative thinking, the thinking out of the box generation of students ?

An example : We brought up a wrongly marked assignment to the class teacher. A snake glides and not slithers ???? Oh, the teacher acknowledged the 'slither' factor but she had to go with 'glide' and marked as such because that was the answer printed at the back of the workbook and they "had to go according to such" !!!

It is not a matter of snob appeal at all when we put the wee lad into an international school after that. Ummm, no, not based on that one mentioned incident alone but all the bits taken in together. We consider ourselves pretty strict parents who would not spare the rod as far as the discipline of our son is concerned. So, our primary motive of the switch is not due to the presumed holistic method of an international schooling. But it can't be denied that the 'other' approach brings out so much more in a child.

Compare and contrast. Year 1 KBRSM. English lessons would normally comprise memorising spellings of words of which sometimes the child wouldn't even have a clue as to the meaning. Parrot learning. And then comprehension - read the story above and answer the set questions. In an international school (British style), a child is encouraged to write anything on a top, e.g., weekend news. The teacher is not at all particular of spelling mistakes but she just wants to child to express himself / herself freely on the paper. Or a story is read and the child is encouraged to write a different ending altogether to the story.

I am not saying that there are no good teachers in both the SJK or private Malaysian schools. There are, I'm sure ... but then, the majority of the crop, well, .... And as reiterated by many other posters, the foremost education begins at home - as in a child has to be encouraged, cajoled to embrace the world beyond textbooks and be given the emotional support to voice out, to stand up and be counted. Parents play a super major role in their child's life ... but we can't deny that a school-going child spends a good part of his or her waking hours in the confines of a school.

Just my two sen on the topic.

p.s. Oh, and one more interesting thing to note. In an international school, all kids are known by their first names - on the class registrar, marked on the cubby holes, etc. No one is addressed as "Tunku so-and-so" or has his or her name listed as xxx bin or s/o Datuk, Tan Sri whatever". :D

End of my thoughts on this thread.

MOYSC
22-05-2007, 05:46 PM
Have you yourself paid a visit to some of the schools suggested here? or are you only looking at subang/usj area? I have friends with kids in Sri Inai and Sri Nobel and they are "fussy" parents who have searched far and wide before deciding.

Also as someone as suggested , no school will be perfect.. as long as parents are very much involved in their children's lives they will turn out alright.

This NST readers' letter suggests that not all private schools are as great as they market themselves.
http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/NST/Monday/Letters/20070521083141/Article/index_html

Its no surprise why some parents have turned to homeschooling. They then realise that they were pushed into a situation where the kids actually benefit the most . :-)

Like you are trying through this forum its best to get first hand info from parents..

I don't know of any parents sending their kids to Sri Nobel & Beaconhse Sri Inai. If anyone has, pls let me know if I can contact them. I've personally seen them & found them to be the better ones among the rest - small, homely concept - just like a big kindergarten for older kids! Definitely better attention (small class size) and somewhat better discipline (small population of students). However, there's no way to check on their teachers' performances.

Yes, I've searched many schools for weeks already. I'm not looking at Subang alone coz' there aren't much choices here. Besides, the schools in Subang are mostly cramped with students - just like any ordinary govt schools.

About homeschooling, I've been exploring this option. I find that it can be done in tandem with kids going to school. It can be difficult to do full time homeschooling coz' there's lack of resources here & we're not trained. Syallabus are all in English- there's no way our kids can sit for local govt exams. Not unless, we register for foreign exams...

Thx for the NST article. Its probably APIIT. The facilities is very rundown despite only 1 yr in operation!

MOYSC
22-05-2007, 06:09 PM
It is not a matter of snob appeal at all when we put the wee lad into an international school after that. Ummm, no, not based on that one mentioned incident alone but all the bits taken in together. We consider ourselves pretty strict parents who would not spare the rod as far as the discipline of our son is concerned. So, our primary motive of the switch is not due to the presumed holistic method of an international schooling. But it can't be denied that the 'other' approach brings out so much more in a child.

.... And as reiterated by many other posters, the foremost education begins at home - as in a child has to be encouraged, cajoled to embrace the world beyond textbooks and be given the emotional support to voice out, to stand up and be counted. Parents play a super major role in their child's life ... but we can't deny that a school-going child spends a good part of his or her waking hours in the confines of a school.


I fully agree that we should teach/guide our children fr home. That's why home-schooling can be really powerful. However, there are lack of resources here on home-schooling & we're not trained to do full time homeschooling programs. Besides, it can be really expensive to buy materials fr overseas, if we had done it alone.

No doubt that International schools are better - the syllabus is already better than our KBSR/KBSM- no need to mention about the other benefits! However, there are many many restrictions for M'sians to enrol their kids into International schools here.

Some of the restrictions are as follows :
1) one parent must be a foreigner and/OR
2) kid(s) hv studied overseas for more than 3 yrs and/OR
3) parent(S) must own an overseas property and/OR
4) parent(s) must hv a valid overseas PR and/or
5) parent(s) hv overseas biz and/or
6) kid hv sibling(s) already studying in an international school elsewhere
7) parent(s) work for Jab PM, Tourism Ministry
etc...

If we do not qualify the above requirement(s), then there is no way we can send our kids to an Int. school. Even if we meet the above requirement(s), there is still a quota to limit intake of M'sian students.

Your kids must be really lucky to get in.

geordie
22-05-2007, 07:46 PM
However, there are many many restrictions for M'sians to enrol their kids into International schools here.

The restrictions quoted above have been abolished since middle of last year. Hence, a rising number of Malaysian students in international schools. I'm not sure whether in this current scenario a letter from MoE is still required for admission. Our case was based on the old ruling whereby one of the requirements was fulfilled. If there is any restriction or limitation, it is on the part of the school. Admission office should be able to advise accordingly.

Re : homeschooling. We have considered that option, albeit very briefly. Just came to a forgone conclusion that we do not possess the right temperament to go along with it. :D

All the best.

MOYSC
23-05-2007, 12:59 PM
The restrictions quoted above have been abolished since middle of last year. Hence, a rising number of Malaysian students in international schools. I'm not sure whether in this current scenario a letter from MoE is still required for admission.

For those who are interested to know, there were only 2 restrictions into International schools earlier (ie. items 1 & 2). The current restrictions are indicated as per my earlier message. Hv confirmed the info with Edu Ministry (Putrajaya) only recently. Yes, parents are required to obtain an approval letter fr the Edu Ministry prior to enrolment.

Didn't know that there were so many restrictions until we called Sayfol International school. The school didn't even know about the restrictions until they received complaints fr parents! Generally, the more restrictions parents "qualify", the better is the chance to obtain approval.

:)

tesdniMa
23-05-2007, 01:35 PM
To put it in simple terms, if you have loads of money , you have a good chance of enrolling your child in an int'l school..then again , if you need to struggle to come up with the tuition fees, don't even consider it.

LMei
23-05-2007, 02:50 PM
To put it in simple terms, if you have loads of money , you have a good chance of enrolling your child in an int'l school..then again , if you need to struggle to come up with the tuition fees, don't even consider it.
Since we do not have loads of money.... Looks like that leaves us with no other option than govt schools. :(

geordie
23-05-2007, 06:33 PM
For those who are interested to know, there were only 2 restrictions into International schools earlier (ie. items 1 & 2). The current restrictions are indicated as per my earlier message. Hv confirmed the info with Edu Ministry (Putrajaya) only recently.

Strange ... I can attest that 4 out of the 5 'full-blood' Malaysian students now in our son's class would not be able to fulfill requirement 1 and 2. Non-titled parents btw. Hishamuddin did announce (towards the end of the first quarter of 2006) a total abolishment of the requirements, hence, the opening of the floodgates. Even in our son's school, an extra class in Year 1 was opened in January this year just to accomodate the influx of Malaysian students. Totally unheard of before, i.e. mid-academic year addition of classrooms.