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evecyanide
21-07-2006, 01:21 PM
Planet Mars will be the brightest in the night sky starting
August.It will look as large as the full moon to the naked eye.This will cultimate on Aug. 27 when Mars comes within 34.65M miles of earth.
Be sure to watch the sky on Aug. 27 12:30 am.
It will look like the earth has 2 moons.
The next time Mars may come this close is in 2287.
Share this with ur friends as NO ONE ALIVE TODAY will ever see it again.

tan_r
21-07-2006, 01:26 PM
Sorry, another hoax (http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_mars_encounter_2006.htm).

evecyanide
21-07-2006, 01:32 PM
:( Then that's too bad.... was looking forward to it. Tan, thanks for letting me know.

FineTuned
21-07-2006, 10:55 PM
This is not a hoax. It is unfortunately what happens when people interpret an real event with half truths.

This event has already occured on 27th August 2003. Mars was in opposition then. Yes, Mars came as close as about 35 million miles to Earth. But it was only about 25 arcseconds in size at this crucial point. The Moon is more than 30 arcminutes in size.

What it means is that Mars looked approximately the size of the Moon when viewed through a telescope by comparison to looking at the Moon with your naked eye.

Every year since 2003, this `rumour' has made its rounds in June, July and August. You will most likely encounter it again next year. Notice that this email announcement (I assume the thread-starter got it through email) has no reference to the year of occurence?

On the 27th August 2006, Mars will actually be on the far side of the Sun, 243 million miles away from us, and you will not be able to see it easily due to its angular proximity to the Sun.

Edited: sorry, I did not read the `hoax' link provided by tan_r and have repeated some of what is already explained in that link. My bad.

maxho
21-07-2006, 11:02 PM
Finetune,

You got it right! It's good to know there are smart , rationale and scientific-minded people living in our neighbourhood. Good for ya for sharing the truth and de-myth the lies.
So who was it that printed the article in the newspaper? ( or did I hear it in the news) Really bad... fooling innocent people like dat..

FineTuned
21-07-2006, 11:37 PM
maxho, did you catch Mars at opposition in 2003? It was truly a magnificient sight!

Last year's opposition was another eye catcher. Some of us with telescopes actually witnessed a gigantic dust storm covering a significant portion of Mars during this period.

The next opposition will be in 19th December 2007, and Mars will be something like 54 million miles from us - another promising view then.

kwchang
22-07-2006, 08:52 AM
Just think, if we can see Mars with our naked eyes, with a visible size equivalent to the moon, it would mean the red planet had gotten so close to Earth that it's gravitational pull will have catastrophic consequences. As it is, the tiny moon is already affecting the tides and sea-levels on Earth. Add to it Mars and I can imagine incredible flooding for coastal areas worldwide. We don't need to worry about tsunamis, this will be worse. Fortunately this is not true.

Sugarfree
26-07-2006, 08:39 PM
Did you catch Mars at opposition in 2003? It was truly a magnificient sight!
Is there a video of that phenomenon? If so, where can I view it? Link, please? :)

chin_wan
26-07-2006, 08:52 PM
This thread is too geeky for me....sorry....cannot understand.

castlegard
26-07-2006, 09:00 PM
This event has already occured on 27th August 2003. Mars was in opposition then.

Just too bad was hoping for a clear dark night with 2 moons above me.

FineTuned
26-07-2006, 09:22 PM
Is there a video of that phenomenon? If so, where can I view it? Link, please? :)
Here:
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2003/18jun_approachingmars.htm
Mind blowing, isn't it?

Unfortunately, during that time I was not into astrophotography yet, so I missed grabbing some never to be seen again memoirs. But viewing Mars through a telescope at that time was the experience of a lifetime. Just think, we still have two little robot cars running around on the surface of Mars right now!

FineTuned
26-07-2006, 09:35 PM
This thread is too geeky for me....sorry....cannot understand.
Nothing to understand. Mars is up there, we are down here. Sometimes Mars gets closer, we wave and say `hi!', then part like `strangers in the the night, exchanging trousers.....'(I can't quite remember the words to Frank Sinatra's hit, but that part I can always recall.)



Just too bad was hoping for a clear dark night with 2 moons above me.
Get a pair of reasonably good binoculars and you can watch 4 moons (usually can see 3 easily) of Jupiter above you tonight.

castlegard
27-07-2006, 01:09 AM
Jupiter? I remember it being the largest planet in the solar system. I should be able to view it with naked eyes without binoculars? ;) But I'm stucked at home tonight with a temperature.

I'm actually wondering if I'm in such luck to view one of the constellations 'pisces', the fish, in the evening sky one day.

FineTuned
27-07-2006, 08:33 AM
Jupiter? I remember it being the largest planet in the solar system. I should be able to view it with naked eyes without binoculars? ;) But I'm stucked at home tonight with a temperature.
Sorry that you are not feeling well. But if you can get someone to help you out of bed, just step out into your garden and take a quick look overhead at about 8.00 - 9.00 pm tonight. If the sky is not too overcast, you should be able to see Jupiter with your naked eye. It's the third brightest object in our sky right now, after the Sun and the Moon. Seeing the moons of Jupiter may need the aid of binoculars or a low powered telescope, although some eagle eyed individuals claim they can see the moons with their naked eyes. It's between the constellations of Libra and Virgo at this moment.

I assume you are a Pisces baby? The constellations are difficult for beginners to identify, because the Klang Valley skies are rarely clear enough for you to be able to make out the main stars which mark the zodiac constellations.

But please note that Astrology has nothing to do with Astronomy. I have not personally encountered any so called `astrologer' who actually does astronomy. They only seem to consult some charts from who knows where. None of the ones I know can actually point out the planets and the constellations in the real sky to me. But they are very good at predicting from the charts, though.

BTW, castlegard, I suspect you know more about astronomy than you let on. ;)

tupai
27-07-2006, 11:12 AM
Sorry that you are not feeling well. But if you can get someone to help you out of bed, just step out into your garden and take a quick look overhead at about 8.00 - 9.00 pm tonight. If the sky is not too overcast, you should be able to see Jupiter with your naked eye. It's the third brightest object in our sky right now, after the Sun and the Moon. Seeing the moons of Jupiter may need the aid of binoculars or a low powered telescope, although some eagle eyed individuals claim they can see the moons with their naked eyes. It's between the constellations of Libra and Virgo at this moment.

I assume you are a Pisces baby? The constellations are difficult for beginners to identify, because the Klang Valley skies are rarely clear enough for you to be able to make out the main stars which mark the zodiac constellations.
...

Finetuned...I am the world's most curious yet most dumbest sky watcher...Can we TT tonite? I belanja you to teach me the basic of the very basics?

ANyway to TT, is good for me.

PM me?
Ta.

Yang Amat Blur dgn langit lato tupai

pcyeoh
27-07-2006, 11:25 AM
Jupiter? I remember it being the largest planet in the solar system. I should be able to view it with naked eyes without binoculars? ;) But I'm stucked at home tonight with a temperature.
Then I suggest you remain in bed. If not, depending on your temperature level, besides the stars (when I am in your condition, I also see stars during the day time) you may tend to see 4 moons instead of 3!!

castlegard
27-07-2006, 11:39 AM
Sorry that you are not feeling well. But if you can get someone to help you out of bed, just step out into your garden and take a quick look overhead at about 8.00 - 9.00 pm tonight. If the sky is not too overcast, you should be able to see Jupiter with your naked eye. It's the third brightest object in our sky right now, after the Sun and the Moon. Seeing the moons of Jupiter may need the aid of binoculars or a low powered telescope, although some eagle eyed individuals claim they can see the moons with their naked eyes. It's between the constellations of Libra and Virgo at this moment.

I assume you are a Pisces baby? The constellations are difficult for beginners to identify, because the Klang Valley skies are rarely clear enough for you to be able to make out the main stars which mark the zodiac constellations.

But please note that Astrology has nothing to do with Astronomy. I have not personally encountered any so called `astrologer' who actually does astronomy. They only seem to consult some charts from who knows where. None of the ones I know can actually point out the planets and the constellations in the real sky to me. But they are very good at predicting from the charts, though.

BTW, castlegard, I suspect you know more about astronomy than you let on. ;)

Thank you Finetuned. There's certainly no substitude for experience and you are the pro here. I would like to learn from you too.

For me, I'm just a boring man whom has missed out one of the greatest pleasures in life, looking at the stars with understanding. I've long decided to take the plunge and get a telescope but seemingly there are too huge a selection of scopes and accessories. Apparently I've been told, there are "giant" binoculars which can give stunning views of the heavens, easier to carry around for quick peeps, but they don't come cheap.

If I get the go ahead light from my family, I will not hesitate any longer. I believe I shall be needing the largest lenses I can comfortably hold? ;)

But if one steady pair could last me a lifetime as I'm intending to buy it only once, could you advice me on where I could find one? As soon as I recover, this old soul in me has been excited and revived to "thoughts" of astronomy all over again. Thank you once again.

ps: I would be honored if we could TT let's say, come next Mars opposition on 19th December 2007.

Regards

CG

orchipalar
27-07-2006, 11:41 AM
Err...Orchi is thinking you guys could be pulling Orchi's leg...

Orchi was NOT aware that one could see Mars or even Jupiter...with naked eyes(???) or even with a pair of binoculars...

When did this happen? we were not told in school that it could be possible? Unless one uses a telescope yang changgih or something...

Hmmm...maybe before Orchi came from a different far away planet or what...? :confused:

Ahem...bro Tupai:)...Orchi is game for TT tonight also...

Err now...hmmm...ver has Orchi kept that old pair of binoculars...which Orchi used to bring along to the race day many many mo0ns ago...

tupai
27-07-2006, 11:45 AM
...Ahem...bro Tupai:)...Orchi is game for TT tonight also...

Err now...hmmm...ver has Orchi kept that old pair of binoculars...which Orchi used to bring along to the race day many many mo0ns ago...


Ok bro..usual place@khalifah usj8? say 8.30pm? I also bring my bino...if we cannot spot the stars or jupiter or pluto...we scope & eye-candy on local venuses :p
How? rsvp via sms...ta.

Yang Ada Binoculars lato tupai

castlegard
27-07-2006, 11:46 AM
Err now...hmmm...ver has Orchi kept that old pair of binoculars...which Orchi used to bring along to the race day many many mo0ns ago...

Orchipalar, can you remember the size of your binoculars? 7x50? 10x50?

FineTuned
27-07-2006, 12:35 PM
..Can we TT tonite? I belanja you to teach me the basic of the very basics?
ANyway to TT, is good for me.

I would love to TT with you ppl in our nice USJ forum everynight! But to be realistic, it is not so good to `teach' astronomy because much of the learning should come from your personal curiousity first. The foundations I got were from my old Physics books. Then I spent some time looking at the night sky and stared at the stars until I could start to recognise regular patterns even though I could not name or identify them.

Nowadays, there is so much information you can get on the internet, that it is probably easier for me to point you to relevant websites for any questions you may have. I personally spend a great deal of time googling for astronomical info when the mood hits me, and when the skies are bad (which is almost every night in the Klang Valley).

I am strictly an amateur in astronomy, ie. I don't have any intention to be an expert per see, and will keep astronomy as a fun thing, and also because fellow amateur astronomers I meet are the nicest people on earth irrespective of their age, race, creed, education level or religion. We just can't argue over the concrete evidence before our eyes when we observe the same sky above our heads.

Don't treat astronomy as a subject which requires understanding. It is primarily something we can enjoy, like looking at flowers and butterflies. Look at the moon when it is up, and then look at it the next night at about the same time. You will notice that it has changed both in shape and relative position in the sky. You don't need to know why, but I'm sure your curiousity will make you do some research. That's how it starts.

BTW the next TT session for our forum is next Friday, right?

Anyway, there is a meteor shower tomorrow morning called the Delta Aquarids. If you can get yourself out of bed early enough at around 5.00 am just before the Sun rises, just look in a southerly direction (or any direction where the sky is clear) and be very patient and alert......you may get to wish on a falling star! No need binoculars or telescopes to enjoy this event.

7x50 binoculars are fine for astronomy, 10x ones may be difficult to hold steady. Larger aperture ones are good for comet hunting and the star clusters, and some nebulae but rather pricey. But binoculars are good for other sights as well..... :rolleyes: ....like bird watching, I mean.

pcyeoh
27-07-2006, 01:03 PM
When did this happen? we were not told in school that it could be possible? Unless one uses a telescope yang changgih or something...

Hmmm...maybe before Orchi came from a different far away planet or what...? :confused: ...
No lah Orchi. From the spelling of changgih, I deduce you must have come from an era many many moons ago lah when everything our teachers said said was gospel truth. Where got the three Ws to check them out?

tupai
27-07-2006, 01:04 PM
I would love to TT with you ppl in our nice USJ forum everynight! ...

7x50 binoculars are fine for astronomy, 10x ones may be difficult to hold steady. Larger aperture ones are good for comet hunting and the star clusters, and some nebulae but rather pricey. But binoculars are good for other sights as well..... :rolleyes: ....like bird watching, I mean.

TQ TQ...we also look forward to learn from you.
IS 40X8 bino good for anything other than watching birds?
Syed Bistro opposite goodyear court 3 - 8.30pm tonite...TT for info on star gazing.

Yang Amat Bintang mata lato tupai

FineTuned
27-07-2006, 03:30 PM
IS 40X8 bino good for anything other than watching birds?
Syed Bistro opposite goodyear court 3 - 8.30pm tonite...TT for info on star gazing.
8x40 Bino is popular specs for birding, and also great for the Moon! No problem if you want to use for astronomy.

I'm afraid I may not be able to make it tonight. But if you guys do get together, just step out of the Bistro, and look up near overhead, then move your sight about 30 degrees westwards (or call it 60 deg from the Western horizon). Don't forget to give your eyes some time to dark adjust. If you can see a bright `star' which doesn't twinkle, that's Jupiter. Now take out your binos and take a look. You will see the moon Europa on one side, and Ganymede and Callisto on the other, all in line. Io is right on the limb of Jupiter and you cannot separate it out unless you use a good telescope. However, if you have the patience to wait until midnight, with the telescope you will be able to see Io peel itself off the edge of Jupiter and move next to Europa. That's how fast the Galilean moons move!

FineTuned
27-07-2006, 09:08 PM
Right now Jupiter is just about 20 degrees west of zenith (zenith is the point right overhead) and visible from Subang Jaya & USJ.

How many of you noticed the sliver thin Crescent Moon setting in the West not too long ago?

I just got back home from work and I'm pretty bushed, so it doesn't look like I can join you guys tonite. But enjoy Jupiter, I tried a sneak peek at it just now through my 20 year old 10x50 binos, and I could make out one of the moons, but the sky isn't clear enough for the other moons. Try again at around 10.30 pm when Jupiter is lower and it will be more comfortable to view. It's tough on the neck to look almost overhead at the moment.

Flynn
27-07-2006, 09:29 PM
You're right, FineTuned! I just took a look at the nightsky and there they are, plain as day. My pair of Made-in-Russia binoculars got stolen years ago but I can still see Jupiter and a small shiny dot next to it which I take to be the moons. Thanks!

FineTuned
27-07-2006, 10:02 PM
My pair of Made-in-Russia binoculars got stolen years ago but I can still see Jupiter and a small shiny dot next to it which I take to be the moons.
You managed to see one of the moons with your naked eyes? Congratulations, I envy you. You are one of the rare group of people with eagle eyes. Good genes there.

Flynn
27-07-2006, 10:07 PM
You managed to see one of the moons with your naked eyes? Congratulations, I envy you. You are one of the rare group of people with eagle eyes. Good genes there.
Good genes, nothing! My optometrist got the power of my lenses right!

There was just one bright dot though, so I'm guessing that all the moons are on the same side of the planet at the same time. Or else that was the biggest moon. I bought a book on astronomy but can't make head or tail of it, so if anyone is meeting up to teach anyone else where to look in the night skies, count me in.

FineTuned
27-07-2006, 10:25 PM
Good genes, nothing! My optometrist got the power of my lenses right!
Well he surely did an excellent job there!



There was just one bright dot though......I bought a book on astronomy but can't make head or tail of it.......
I think we both saw Ganymede, which is the brightest of the lot.

My advice is not to try to understand astronomy because a lot of it is too theoretical and meaningless unless you are planning to do a PhD on it. Enjoy the viewing, and then do some research on things you managed to observe - that makes it more relevant and interesting. Don't feel you have to know everything over night!

tupai
28-07-2006, 01:59 AM
By Golly! I saw nuthin! except pretty venuses all around me... :p My bino case ended up as a kitty pot (with excess collections going to Shalom Home :D and the bino been used by one of the Martians to have a very very close view of a Venus' 2 moons :D

Naughty him that Martian! :p :p

A good nite out to view & interact with Venuses...yes, no grammar mistake, its plural.

By Jupiter! i will try harder to view you next! :D

Yang Ada Bino utk venus aje lato tupai

FineTuned
28-07-2006, 06:45 AM
By Golly! I saw nuthin! except pretty venuses all around me... .....By Jupiter! i will try harder to view you next! :D

Sounds like you had a jolly good time anyway!

Never mind, you can try again any night when there are less distractions (can't compete with venuses around), Jupiter will be still be up there for quite some time.